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I'd like to use a git client in a product I'm shipping.

The problem is that the machine on which my product is installed doesn't have git installed. Installing it requires a big bureaucratic effort, which I'd like to avoid.

Is there a single git binary that can run on all linux 64bit distributions?

In git's official site, I couldn't find such an option - just installation instruction for different package managers and Linux flavors.

There are many Linux apps that provide a single executable for all Linux distributions, for example, Sublime. Any idea why Git is different?

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    google for "git statically linked". I get several relevant results.
    – phemmer
    May 2, 2018 at 11:16
  • @Patrick thanks. "googled" for "git statically linked" and found issues with linking to libcurl. May 2, 2018 at 12:01
  • The closest I found was this, but it hasn't been updated in 2 years. Also because git started out as hacky shell scripts it's still organised as a mountain of separate commands rather than a single git binary. Actually some commands still are hacky shell scripts. Probably the only reasonable option is to build from source. :-/
    – Timmmm
    Apr 7, 2021 at 13:12
  • Actually it's not too hard to statically compile Git yourself, but there are some issues - see my answer here.
    – Timmmm
    Apr 7, 2021 at 13:56

1 Answer 1

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There's an unofficial AppImage of Github Desktop: https://github.com/shiftkey/desktop/releases

Just follow the instructions:

# Download it
wget https://github.com/shiftkey/desktop/releases/download/release-1.1.1/GitHubDesktop-linux-x86_64-1.1.1.AppImage

# Make it executable
chmod u+x GitHubDesktop-linux-x86_64-1.1.1.AppImage

# Run it (you can also double-click it)
./GitHubDesktop-linux-x86_64-1.1.1.AppImage

It should look like:

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    Thank, but I'm looking for a general GIT client that's compatible with any GIT repo - not just github. May 3, 2018 at 7:47
  • 1
    How does this answer the question? Oct 15, 2020 at 11:37

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