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I'm trying to identify AMD graphics card between onboard and dedicated GPU.

using sudo find /sys/devices | grep pp_dpm_mclk I was able to find information regarding AMD graphics card.

now that I have those information, how do I know which is the onboard GPU? thank you for any suggestions / pointer

(edited) here's the lspci | grep VGA

00:01.0 VGA compatible controller: Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] Device 98e4 (rev 81)
07:00.0 VGA compatible controller: Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] Device 67df (rev c7)
09:00.0 VGA compatible controller: Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] Device 67df (rev e7)
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    please add the output of lspci | grep VGA to your question. – cas Dec 28 '17 at 3:08
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    Device id's are registered and published, a search for pci id 98e4 got me to this page, which says 67df is your rx480. – jthill Dec 28 '17 at 3:41
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    the GPU in the lowest numbered PCI "slot" is usually (almost always) the built-in GPU. 00:01.0 in this case. looking up the device id and revision (98e4 rev81), it's an AMD Radeon™ R4E Graphics adapter. The other two seem to be an RX 480 and an RX 580. – cas Dec 28 '17 at 3:43
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    i guess you could memorise all the device codes and revisions for all GPU manufacturers. or compile a list. more seriously, as I mentioned, the GPU in the lowest numbered PCI slot is almost certainly the on-board GPU. Try it and see. If it isn't, move on to the next. repeat until you've found it. – cas Dec 28 '17 at 3:49
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    the list could be a lot shorter if you only bother memorising what GPUs you bought and which slot you installed them in (and on which system) :) i.e. this seems to be more of an asset management issue than a tech issue. – cas Dec 28 '17 at 4:18
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Device id's are registered and published, a search for pci id 98e4 got me to this page, which says 67df/c7 is your rx480.

That page doesn't look like it's as well-maintained as its prominence on the search results suggests. I think lshw/lspci/hwinfo all use a pci.ids file maintained collaboratively by volunteers, if you're using one of the stability-uber-alles distros, debian stable or rhel or centos maybe, I guess that file could be far enough out of date that those id's aren't registered yet.

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