2

Input Contents:

objectClass: top
objectClass: person
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: inetorgperson
objectClass: org-abc
objectClass: org-xyz

objectClass: top
objectClass: inetOrgPerson
objectClass: org-abc
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: person

objectClass: top
objectClass: org-abc
objectClass: inetOrgPerson
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: person
objectClass: org-xyz

objectClass: top
objectClass: inetOrgPerson
objectClass: org-xyz
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: person

Read a LDIF file of size 50 MB.

The contents between two new-lines are considered as a BLOCK.

  • if both the lines (objectClass: org-abc & objectClass: org-xyz) are present in any order in a BLOCK, then remove those 2 lines in a BLOCK and add a new line as "objectClass: org-111"

(OR)

  • if this line "objectClass: org-abc" alone is present in a BLOCK, then replace that line with "objectClass: org-222"

(OR)

  • if this line "objectClass: org-xyz" alone is present in a BLOCK, then replace that line with "objectClass: org-333"

Expected Output:

objectClass: top
objectClass: person
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: inetorgperson
objectClass: org-111

objectClass: top
objectClass: inetOrgPerson
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: person
objectClass: org-222

objectClass: top
objectClass: inetOrgPerson
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: person
objectClass: org-111

objectClass: top
objectClass: inetOrgPerson
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: person
objectClass: org-333

How can I get such output using Linux commands (sed or awk) or suggest me a better approach?

  • 1
    Your example output doesn't match your description. You are adding objectClass: org-222 at the end but say it should be replacing whichever line had the objectClass: org-abc. Which one is it? – terdon Nov 16 '17 at 10:14
  • 1
    Agreed @terdon . The modified line can be at the end or at the replaced line itself. Thanks for pointing out. Both the output cases are working for me – Mahe Nov 16 '17 at 11:10
0

Also easy with sed:

sed '/^$/!{H;1h;$!d;};x
  /objectClass: org-abc/!{s/\(objectClass: org-\)xyz/\1333/;p;d;}
  s/\(objectClass: org-\)xyz/\1111/;t1
  s/\(objectClass: org-\)abc/\1222/;:b
  :1
  s/\nobjectClass: org-abc//'

The first line is to collect one block in the pattern space, the rest does the obvious replacements.

0

This is a typical use case of Perl's "paragraph mode" (-00) where "lines" are defined by \n\n, so each paragraph is treated as a single line:

$ perl -00 -lpe 'if(/: org-abc/ && /: org-xyz/){
                    s/(^|\n)[^\n]+: (org-abc|org-xyz)\s*(?=$|\n)//g;
                    s/$/\nobjectClass: org-111/;
                 }
                 else{
                    s/objectClass: org-abc/objectClass: org-222/; 
                    s/objectClass: org-xyz/objectClass: org-333/
                 }' file
objectClass: top
objectClass: person
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: inetorgperson
objectClass: org-111

objectClass: top
objectClass: inetOrgPerson
objectClass: org-222
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: person

objectClass: top
objectClass: inetOrgPerson
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: person
objectClass: org-111

objectClass: top
objectClass: inetOrgPerson
objectClass: org-333
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: person

Here's the same thing uncondensed into a script for clarity:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

## Paragraph mode
local $/="\n\n";

my $pat1 = 'objectClass: org-abc';
my $pat2 = 'objectClass: org-xyz';

## Read input file
while (my $line = <>) {
  ## Remove trailing newlines
  chomp($line);

  if($line =~ /$pat1/ && $line=~ /$pat2/){
    $line =~ s/(^|\n)($pat1|pat2)\s*(?=$|\n)//g;
    $line =~ s/$/\nobjectClass: org-111/;
  }
  else{
    $line =~ s/$pat1/objectClass: org-222/;
    $line =~ s/$pat2/objectClass: org-333/
  }
  print "$line\n\n";
}
2

Complex AWK solution:

awk 'function process(a,c) {       # process the lines of one passed block
         for (i=1; i<=c; i++) {    
             split(a[i], fields);  # split the line into 2 fields
             if (fields[2]=="org-abc") abc="222"; 
             else if (fields[2]=="org-xyz") xyz="333"; 
             else print a[i] 
         } 
         if (abc || xyz) printf "objectClass: org-%s\n",(abc && xyz? "111" : (abc? "222":"333")) 
     }
     !NF{ process(a, c); c=abc=xyz=0 }
     { a[++c]=$0 }
     END{ process(a, c) }' file

This is Memory sufficient solution, cause the array a will hold the lines of one single block only during the whole processing time. (counter c is getting reset on each next block)

The output:

objectClass: top
objectClass: person
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: inetorgperson
objectClass: org-111

objectClass: top
objectClass: inetOrgPerson
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: person
objectClass: org-222

objectClass: top
objectClass: inetOrgPerson
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: person
objectClass: org-111

objectClass: top
objectClass: inetOrgPerson
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: person
objectClass: org-333
  • 1
    @Mahe If one of these answers solved your issue, please take a moment and accept it by clicking on the check mark to the left. That will mark the question as answered and is the way thanks are expressed on the Stack Exchange sites. – terdon Nov 16 '17 at 11:24

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