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Windows 7 BOOTMGR is missing when I try to boot into the OS from GRUB. Im not anywhere near being a pro when it comes to partioning or whatever so here's a image of gparted: gparted hdd

And a copy paste of /boot/grub/menu.lst:

# general configuration:
timeout   10
default   0
color light-blue/black light-cyan/blue

# boot sections follow
# each is implicitly numbered from 0 in the order of appearance below
#
# TIP: If you want a 1024x768 framebuffer, add "vga=773" to your kernel line.
#
#-*

# (0) Arch Linux
title  Arch Linux
root   (hd0,4)
kernel /vmlinuz-linux root=/dev/sda4 ro
initrd /initramfs-linux.img

# (1) Arch Linux
title  Arch Linux Fallback
root   (hd0,4)
kernel /vmlinuz-linux root=/dev/sda4 ro
initrd /initramfs-linux-fallback.img

# (2) Windows
title Windows Seven 64bit
rootnoverify (hd0,2)
#makeactive
chainloader +1

Someone point me in the right direction to fix this problem...

EDIT: I changed rootnoverify (hd0,1) to rootnoverify (hd0,2), result is now a system that reboots immediately after attempted boot. (straight back to BIOS screen)....

5
  • noted. apparently i only have grub1 installed. my apologies. changing tag and title.
    – snnth
    Commented May 21, 2012 at 18:22
  • 4
    try to use chainloader(hd0,1)+1 and switch back to (hd0,1) as grub starts counting at 0. You should also consider upgrading to grub2. Commented May 21, 2012 at 18:49
  • Does the /boot partition must not be placed first ? I read that somewhere but I can't remember where... (Or maybe it's another partition, I'm just curious)
    – Depado
    Commented May 22, 2012 at 7:46
  • I remember reading somewhere that the BIOS of older systems cant read past approximately 8GB of data on the front of your HDD. I dont know how this applies to super-recent systems (like mine). As you can see my /boot partition is at the end of my HDD, and the BIOS has had no problems accessing that.
    – snnth
    Commented May 22, 2012 at 16:25
  • @Depado tldp.org/HOWTO/Large-Disk-HOWTO-4.html#ss4.2 my above assumption was correct, 2TB is the new max for new protocols.
    – snnth
    Commented May 22, 2012 at 17:40

1 Answer 1

5

chainloader(hd0,0)+1 did the job.

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