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I've got a server on Debian 8.1 (3.16.0-4-amd64) which is telling me that disk used is high and I can not see why.

Disks usage

df -h :

Filesystem                           Size    Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda1                            440G    298G  120G  72% /
udev                                  10M       0   10M   0% /dev
tmpfs                                3,2G    337M  2,8G  11% /run
tmpfs                                7,9G       0  7,9G   0% /dev/shm
tmpfs                                5,0M       0  5,0M   0% /run/lock
tmpfs                                7,9G       0  7,9G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
192.168.10.50:/c/logs                5,5T    1,9T  3,7T  34% /mnt/nas
192.168.11.250:/data/logs_hotspots   8,2T    1,6T  6,6T  20% /mnt/NAS
tmpfs                                1,6G       0  1,6G   0% /run/user/1000

Size of each folder :

du -sh :

11M     /bin
46M     /boot
0       /dev
37M     /etc
464K    /home
0       /initrd.img
0       /initrd.img.old
312M    /lib
4,0K    /lib64
16K     /lost+found
16K     /media
8,0K    /opt
64K     /root
337M    /run
5,1M    /sbin
4,0K    /srv
0       /sys
24K     /tmp
447M    /usr
233M    /var
0       /vmlinuz
0       /vmlinuz.old

It is increasing slowly since last year and since it is a production server, I do not want (can not) to restart it.

Note : NFS mounts are only for syslog-ng.

If anyone has an idea...

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  • du -sh without arguments should give only the size of the folder you are in. Could it be you actually did du -sh /* and missed the dotted files/folders? Try du -sm /* /.??* | sort -n to also catch those.
    – Philippos
    Commented Aug 17, 2017 at 12:41
  • I did du -sh in a for loop on each / folder (except /mnt where only my 2 NAS are mounted).
    – polioman
    Commented Aug 18, 2017 at 13:08

1 Answer 1

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You can have a look at the output of 'lsof | grep deleted' ... to see if deleted files are still taking up diskspace.

You can then decide to restart or reload the processes still holding on to deleted files to clear up the used diskspace.

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  • Here is the output of that command : root@vpn-syslog:~# lsof | grep deleted COMMAND PID TID USER FD TYPE DEVICE SIZE/OFF NODE NAME openvpn 20650 nobody 1w REG 8,1 319014263195 14157696 /var/log/openvpn.log.1 (deleted) openvpn 20650 nobody 2w REG 8,1 319014263195 14157696 /var/log/openvpn.log.1 (deleted)
    – polioman
    Commented Aug 18, 2017 at 13:23
  • Files seems to be quite big : 319014263195. But if they are deleted, why are they still growing?
    – polioman
    Commented Aug 18, 2017 at 13:29
  • I restarted openvpn and it solved my problem. I now have only 1% of disk used. Thanks for the help.
    – polioman
    Commented Oct 16, 2017 at 10:08

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