3

I have the following output whenever I issue task:

TASKRC override: /path/taskrc
TASKDATA override: /path/.task

It's because I put the config and data files in non-default external location specified by $TASKRC and $TASKDATA environment variables of Taskwarrior.

How could I make task to be quiete and not warn me everytime.

I'd like to find the command line switch to make it quiet for the issueing time (once) and the also config file option to make it permanent, if any.

  • Would it be possible, instead of overriding configuration, to create soft links, in place of the expected files, linking to your own? – SYN May 25 '17 at 10:56
  • No, I don't want to create symlinks. If the variables are available, then the use of them should be done too I think. – user86041 May 25 '17 at 12:04
  • 1
    Note that this was reported upstream in github.com/GothenburgBitFactory/taskwarrior/issues/… with recommended resolution similar to unix.stackexchange.com/a/406599/108198 – Ben Creasy Apr 14 '18 at 17:17
1

You need to lower the verbosity by removing header from verbose. By default, verbose=yes, so you need to manually list each type of message that you want to see.

For example, I fixed this by fully defining verbosity minus a few items:

verbose=blank,footnote,label,new-id,affected,edit,special,project,sync,unwait

in my ~/.config/task/config (or whatever your $TASKRC is). Note that I also removed filter from my verbosity, but that's not necessary to fix the problem. Just remove header.

Note also that removing header will also hide the [task custom] message at the top of the output. If you need that message, the alternative would be to manually filter out the warning using grep and some regular expressions.

TL;DR: place this in the file at $TASKRC:

verbose=blank,footnote,label,new-id,affected,edit,special,project,sync,unwait
  • 1
    (to document:) this was done by issuing task show verbose to get the value and task config verbose=(list) where header field was removed from the list retrieved. – user86041 Jan 26 '18 at 14:35
  • 3
    I wouldn't be surprised if this solution turns out to hide important output, and it could be difficult to hide the warning using grep. If that's the case though, I'd call this error a bug in Taskwarrior. – gmarmstrong Jan 26 '18 at 15:42
  • What is [task custom] used for? – StevieD Apr 30 at 20:29

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy