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This question already has an answer here:

I'm wondering what command I can use to see all the hardware in any PC, or at least some of it (for example, model of the motherboard). I'm pretty new on Linux, I'm using a lightweight version to boot in computers that I had to make a format, and previous back-up. Some of these PCs are old, or with a very specific hardware and sometimes it's hard to find drivers.

marked as duplicate by don_crissti, Thomas Nyman, Community Mar 23 '17 at 13:02

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  • 1
    Try lshw or lspci – Zumo de Vidrio Mar 23 '17 at 12:48
  • lspci worked, lshw don't. Thanks a lot, that was i needed. – Bruno Bollati Mar 23 '17 at 13:01
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lshw uses a variety of sources to provide a comprehensive list of the hardware in a system. You should run it as root to get as much detail as possible.

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You can use inxi for that. On CentOS you can install it from epel repository. Or you can get it from github.

you get nice listing with inxi -F Here's an example output from one of my servers:

System:    Host: localhost.localdomain Kernel: 2.6.32-642.6.2.el6.x86_64 

x86_64 (64 bit) Console: tty 0
           Distro: CentOS release 6.8 (Final)
Machine:   Device: vmware System: VMware product: VMware Virtual Platform serial: VMware-42 0d cb f6 eb cc 9a 59-a9 74 dc 01 df a6 d6 a3
           Mobo: Intel model: 440BX Desktop Reference Platform BIOS: Phoenix v: 6.00 date: 09/21/2015
CPU(s):    3 Single core Intel Xeon E5-2640 v3s (-SMP-) cache: 61440 KB
           clock speeds: max: 2599 MHz 1: 2599 MHz 2: 2599 MHz 3: 2599 MHz
Graphics:  Card: VMware SVGA II Adapter
           Display Server: N/A driver: N/A tty size: 117x70 Advanced Data: N/A for root out of X
Network:   Card: VMware VMXNET3 Ethernet Controller driver: vmxnet3
           IF: eth0 state: up speed: 10000 Mbps duplex: full mac: 00:50:56:88:b4:c7
Drives:    HDD Total Size: 139.6GB (45.0% used)
           ID-1: /dev/sda model: Virtual_disk size: 21.5GB
           ID-2: /dev/sdb model: Virtual_disk size: 118.1GB
Partition: ID-1: / size: 11G used: 2.4G (23%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda1
           ID-2: /var size: 4.8G used: 1.1G (24%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda2
           ID-3: /var/log size: 2.0G used: 251M (14%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda3
           ID-4: /tmp size: 4.8G used: 733M (16%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/dm-1
           ID-5: swap-1 size: 1.07GB used: 0.04GB (4%) fs: swap dev: /dev/sda5
RAID:      No RAID devices: /proc/mdstat, md_mod kernel module present
Sensors:   None detected - is lm-sensors installed and configured?
Info:      Processes: 155 Uptime: 144 days Memory: 1972.7/3832.3MB Init: Upstart runlevel: 3
           Client: Shell (bash) inxi: 2.3.8

It can also tell you current weather with inxi -w:

Weather:   Conditions: 44 F (7 C) - Clear Time: March 23, 2:53 PM EET
  • i will try this, but lspci it work for me – Bruno Bollati Mar 23 '17 at 13:02
  • lspci is intended for PCI devices only.. there is also lsblk, lsscsi, lscpu and possibly some others aswell – StefanR Mar 23 '17 at 13:10

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