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I'm thinking it would be similar to tee, except with a popup window instead of a file. Here is an example of what I mean:

echo "hello world" | tee file

Puts the output in the file and in the console as input happens from the pipe.

echo "hello world" | something_here

Puts output in a newly created GUI and in the console as input happens from the pipe and then waits for the user to close the window.

Showing the output in real time would be preferable.

  • MATE Panel has an applet to do that. I'm not sure it's quite what you're after, though. And I don't know about other DEs. – Stephen Angelico Feb 21 '17 at 3:03
  • Possible duplicate – dirkt Feb 21 '17 at 6:27
  • Can you help us help you? What Linux distro and version are you using? What Desktop Environment and Window Manager are you using? What shell are you using? Different configurations often have different tools available. Also, are you willing to use create, or use, a custom script if there are no tools that fit your needs? The last is one of the many attractions Linux has for people. – Gypsy Spellweaver Feb 28 '17 at 5:51
1

Zenity has a --listen option. The only caveat is that it expects specific key words on stdin. From the man page:

--listen

Listen for commands on stdin. Commands include 'message', 'tooltip', 'icon', and 'visible' separated by a colon. For example, 'message: Hello world', 'visible: false', or 'icon: /path/to/icon'. The icon command also accepts the four stock icon: 'error', 'info', 'question', and 'warning'

It's hard to say without knowing exactly what your situation is, but one possibility is to convert your output to a format that Zenity expects before sending it to Zenity's stdin.

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