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I have copied some data from a client's home folder to a group work folder accessed by a group in Linux. Other clients can see most of the data except some in a specific folder.

When the new client tries to access the data from a Windows machine, the directories are shown as empty. When the same folder is accessed through Linux using ssh, the client gets a "permission denied" error.

This looks like a permissions issue for the new client, the folder permissions are;
drwxrwsr-x 2 root 4096 Feb 1 11:14

and file permissions are
-rw-rw---- 1 root 11 Feb 1 21:18
-rwxrw-r-- 1 root 1500 Feb 1 21:18

The user trying to access these files and folders is already in the group which has permissions to this work area.
Should I do a
chmod -R 774 /folder_path and then
chown -R (saket):(scannergrp) /folder_path

  • Could you please say what is the groupname? – lese Feb 13 '17 at 8:36
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    It may be worth running 'namei -l <target dir>' to see if the permissions on the parent directories are not what you require. – Brett Levene Feb 13 '17 at 18:12
  • sounds like posting relevant sections of smb.conf could be good too – ivanivan Feb 14 '17 at 2:21
  • Brett, you are on the ball and yes ivanian, further information was needed; because the folders were copied to an existing directory there were some folders where the permissions did not apply correctly and had the permissions <br/>drwxrwS--- also read the following <br/>unix.stackexchange.com/questions/118853/… and superuser.com/questions/509114/… sudo find /correct/folder/path -type d -exec chmod g+x "{}" \; fixed it for the user. Thank you all – Mr104 Feb 22 '17 at 4:17
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Brett, you are on the correct path, and yes, ivanian, further information was needed; since the folders were copied to an existing directory there were some folders where the permissions did not apply correctly and had the permissions drwxrwS---.

Also read What does the 's' attribute in file permissions mean?

The command below applied the correct permissions.

sudo find /correct/folder/path -type d -exec chmod g+x "{}" \;

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