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Today I was unable to connect to my home access point eventhough the key is correct. I searched the log files and found the following entries:

NetworkManager[1272]: <info>  [1486388354.0812] device (wlan1): 
    supplicant interface state: scanning -> authenticating
kernel: wlan1: RX AssocResp from 80:c6:ab:49:02:e6 (capab=0x411 status=18 aid=0)
kernel: wlan1: 80:c6:ab:49:02:e6 denied association (code=18)
NetworkManager[1272]: <info>  [1486388354.0865] device (wlan1): 
    supplicant interface state: authenticating -> associating

Question: Where can I find more information about the AssocResp with capab=0x411, status=18 and aid=0. Or how can I find out why the association was denied?

When I am connecting network manager does not give me any kind of error message and just keeps prompting me for the password so the above log entries are the only clue that I currently have.

Update After playing a bit with my routers wireless settings I realized that the problem was comming from an option named:

802.11 N Support Required

When I switched this to off my notebook was immediately able to connect to my wireless network.

NetworkManager[1272]: <info>  [1486736944.1725] device (wlan1):
   supplicant interface state: authenticating -> associating
kernel: wlan1: associate with 80:c6:ab:49:02:e6 (try 1/3)
kernel: wlan1: associate with 80:c6:ab:49:02:e6 (try 2/3)
kernel: wlan1: RX AssocResp from 80:c6:ab:49:02:e6 (capab=0x411 status=0 aid=1)
wpa_supplicant[2140]: wlan1: Associated with 80:c6:ab:49:02:e6
kernel: wlan1: associated
NetworkManager[1272]: <info>  [1486736944.2821] device (wlan1):
    supplicant interface state: associating -> associated

However I know for sure that my wireless card is able to connect to class N wifi networks. Checking with lshw for the current wifi driver confirms that the wireless interface for wlan1 is a Centrino Advanced-N 6205 from Intel.

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  • Depending on your exact OS and WiFi firmware versions, the wireless interface might have required a module option to actually enable the N mode. I seem to recall that when the N mode was initially implemented in the Linux driver for Intel WiFI cards, it did not work too well at first. It took some time to get it debugged to the point that it worked reliably, and so it was not enabled by default until it had been available for quite a while.
    – telcoM
    Nov 24, 2021 at 11:21

1 Answer 1

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I was unable to find the specific problem here

It can be a problem of

Hardware - wifi adapter or

kernel module functioning error or

Network manager daemon service corrupted.

Use these commands to give it a try

service network-manager stop

ifconfig wlan0 down

ifconfig wlan0 up

wpa_supplicant -B -i wlan0 -c > (wpa_passphrase essid key)

dhclient wlan0

confirm your connection

ping 8.8.8.8

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