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I'm using the traceroute utility to test network connectivity.

The problem is usually with slow speed - that means, the webpages in the browser are often displayed very slowly. Sometimes the speed of rendering HTML page is better, but the videos from youtube are transfered very slowly, so that you can watch it usually with many pauses.

I'd like to identify from the output of traceroute utility or it's combination with other utilities (such as ping, mtr and other) where the problem on the trace is.

It means to use the combination of the utilities repeatedly to output some logs or statistics from which a decision can be made if the problem with slow response (or often connetivity loss) is caused by my closer ISP (three wireless routers) or his ISP. I would like to have some data I can provide them in case of connectivity or speed issues (it's really unreliable connection, very often problems).

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    This sounds like a link somewhere with inadequate bandwidth or excessive drops. I think you need more detailed knowledge of the networks in question, and access to the statistics of the network devices. With a good ISP, they will have that expertise and could track the problem for you. If your ISP is incapable of doing that, the only way you can fix it is by switching to a better ISP. – MAP Jan 6 '17 at 2:28
  • Video and high traffic sites are often throttled by ISPs. Did you make some tests with more innocuous content like a Linux iso image, or a huge tar file, from lesser known HTTP and FTP sites, like a university repository? – xhienne Jan 14 '17 at 11:56
  • @xhienne Naturally, I tried to download the video with youtube-dl and watch later, when it wasn't possible to watch directly. The point is. I'd like to identify connectivity and speed issues (statistically), from the computer I'm using, to one router, next, router, ISP1 router, ISP2 router... and decide if there is a problem with device I have control over it or there is a problem with the device one of the ISPs have control over it. – xralf Jan 14 '17 at 14:59
  • @xralf If you only need to decide if the problem is with your devices try to ping the destination from your linux box, then ping the destination from your second router. Compare the time it takes to get a reply. ping may not produce much traffic, but any router should be equipped with it. If there's a wget utility or ftp on the router then use that for the comparison. – Centimane Jan 19 '17 at 22:14
  • @xralf Can you post what type of routers you have? This seems more like a systems question than specific to Linux alone. – Centimane Jan 19 '17 at 22:15
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+200

First, since your browser makes connections to multiple hosts, you need to know which one to check (if you don't already). There are a number of tools that can passively gather TCP statistics.

Now, mtr is a tool specifically created to measure connection reliability and output reports that can be sent to ISPs verbatim. It makes traceroute and ping effectively obsolete for that task.

Normally (without -r), it runs constantly, accumulates and updates stats of latency and loss percentage at each hop. Diagnosing Network Issues with MTR article includes some common patterns that you can see in results and how to interpret them.

Since at least 0.75, mtr can use TCP SYN rather than ICMP packets with -T -P <port>, so you'll get stats for the same TCP ports as your normal traffic.

  • I like your answer best so far, though the other two answers are of great value here as well. – xralf Jan 19 '17 at 20:12
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I'd like to identify from the output of traceroute utility or it's combination with other utilities (such as ping, mtr and other) where the problem on the trace is.

You could use bing <host1> <host2> which will calculate the bandwidth between these two hosts. As hosts, use different couples of two adjacent hops as obtained from the output of traceroute. You will eventually determine the bandwidth between each couple of hops and identify where the bottleneck is.

1

What do you mean by:

It means to use the combination of the utilities repeatedly to output some logs or statistics from which a decision can be made if the problem with slow response (or often connetivity loss) is caused by my closer ISP (three wireless routers) or his ISP.

Are you using three wireless devices in order to have an Internet connection? I mean you need three hops in order to start "talking" with your ISP? If yes, those routers/access points are in the same building? And if the answer is yes again, check the channels in each access point. In order not to have any overlapping, you should use channels that have at least 5 channels range between them, eg. 1, 6 and 11 if you are using a 2.4GHz band. If you are using same channels, or close to each other channels, then you are having a "noisy" channel which can be responsible for these weird speeds.

For more info, please check:
Why channels 1, 6, 11
Differentiating the 5 GHz and 2.4 GHz frequency bands

Also, last but not least you may check if there is any QoS (Quality of Service) running by default on your router which has higher prio for HTML pages instead of live streaming videos etc.

  • I have wired connection to my router. My router is wirelessly connected to the router of the charterer (whole building owner) and that device is connected (wired or wireleslly) to the device of the city ISP. What I mean? If traceroute can be used to decide with of the devises is most buggy (loss of connection or speed) – xralf Jan 16 '17 at 12:34
  • Are you using three wireless devices in order to have an Internet connection? I mean you need three hops in order to start "talking" with your ISP? Yes, three hops, to talk to the city ISP (wired or wireless) – xralf Jan 16 '17 at 12:36
  • Those routers/access points are in the same building? Yes, but I have access into only my device (I'm using it, because my laptop wireless network card has problem with "catching" the signal, so I'm connected with a wire to my wireless router first) – xralf Jan 16 '17 at 12:39
  • My router has found 12 access points. 3 of them are of the charterer (building owner) (r1, r2, r3). r1 is on channel 1, r2 is on channel 1 and r3 is on channel 2. I'm using r3 now, it's the only one that is password protected. btw. How can I find out if I'm using 2.4 or 5 GHz frequency bands? – xralf Jan 16 '17 at 12:59
  • @xralf there is a possibility that this latency issue is due to wireless channel overlapping. Even though you connect to your access point via Ethernet, you AP with the building's AP is connected wirelessly. Also you wireless card issue with "catching" the signal, may be relevant to this (overlapping issue in general). If you can, find yours AP channel and contact, whoever is responsible, in order to find out in which channel is running this AP (and also the final that is connected to the ISP). Check these channels and change yours AP channel after this info based on the 5 channel rule. – blametheadmin Jan 16 '17 at 13:00

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