4

On a fresh install of Fedora 19 I am attempting to change the password to something simple, like Password01 (this is just a simple testing VM, nothing fancy), but the password complexity requirements prevent me from setting anything easy to remember.

How can I bypass the complexity requirements or disable them?

the contents of /etc/pam.d/passwd:

#%PAM-1.0
auth       include  system-auth
account    include  system-auth
password   substack system-auth
-password   optional    pam_gnome_keyring.so use_authtok
password   substack postlogin

Even as root I cannot bypass the requirements:

enter image description here

justincase@localhost ~ $ sudo -s
[sudo] password for justincase: 
[root@localhost justincase]# passwd justincase
Changing password for user justincase.
New password: 
BAD PASSWORD: The password fails the dictionary check - it is based on a dictionary word
Retype new password: 
[root@localhost justincase]# 
  • look at /etc/pam.d/common-passwd, or passwd, or something similar – Ipor Sircer Nov 17 '16 at 17:38
  • 2
    Did you try changing the password from a terminal with sudo passwd <username>? I don't have Fedora, but from what I have read it may give you a warning about the password quality but should still change it. – Paul H. Nov 17 '16 at 18:54
  • @PaulH. Yes I did try that, it didn't work :/ – Seth Nov 17 '16 at 19:53
  • 2
    Root should still be able to change passwords bypassing requirements. – Roflo Nov 17 '16 at 22:21
  • @Roflo See the edited question. Even root does not work. – Seth Nov 18 '16 at 16:17
10

As root you can bypass the requirements. Your example shows this happening:

# passwd justincase
Changing password for user justincase.
New password:
BAD PASSWORD: The password fails the dictionary check - it is based on a dictionary word
Retype new password:
#

Notice it does not repeat the New password prompt but instead it asks you to retype the (bad) new password you are entering. If you had continued with the alleged bad password you would have been able to set it as the password for justincase.

  • You can get rid of having to type the password in twice as root by adding <password sufficient pam_rootok.so> at the end of the /etc/pam.d/passwd file or /etc/pam.d/common-password, or whatever pam file the requirement is in. – anotherguy Feb 1 at 3:20
  • @anotherguy agreed, but that's a different answer. – roaima Feb 1 at 7:17

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