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I am longing for a tool for linux that would give me a general idea what is happening on a machine. Example information I am looking for:

  • What daemons are installed (www, db, others)
  • Config locations for those services
  • What kernel and distro is the server running and how old the distro is (would love if the tool would also tell if the distro is still supported)
  • RAM, CPU, and disk space information
  • Mounted drives/paths
  • Information about my account: am I a sudoer, other usefull information
  • General network information (blocked, or rather open ports)

Edit:

  • Installed interpreters/compilers and their versions (C, Python, etc.)
  • X version and any DE installed

closed as too broad by Thomas Dickey, techraf, HalosGhost, don_crissti, G-Man Nov 7 '16 at 23:41

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 4
    There are common, simple ways to check all of these things. Why do you want a single tool that does everything? That's not the UNIX way. – OrangeDog Nov 7 '16 at 22:41
  • Ah yes, simplicity and user friendliness - not the UNIX way ;) – data Nov 15 '16 at 7:02
16

You can use inxi , it can be installed on the must known linux distro:

Debian users:

sudo apt-get install inxi

RHLE/CentOS/Fedora users

sudo yum install inxi

Arch users:

sudo pacman -S inxi

Check inxi -h to get the list of options , there is an example to display the system info:

inxi -v7 -c 0

What daemons are installed (www, db, others)

You can check the installed daemons through the systemd features to analyse the system state

  • I didn't find any information about inxi display web/db daemon information, can it display that too? – data Nov 7 '16 at 12:08
  • unfortunately inxi dosn't have this feature – GAD3R Nov 7 '16 at 14:01
  • Arch should be pacman -S, not pacman -s. – NoOneIsHere Nov 7 '16 at 20:22
  • although inxi doesn't technically have a specific web/db daemon output, being primarily a hardware oriented thing, it does have the -t option, which outputs, depending on the parameters given, the top 1 to 20 processes for either cpu or memory, ie: inxi -tc20 will show the top 20 cpu intensive processes, excluding inxi itself. – Lizardx Nov 9 '16 at 2:45
3

Service information on modern systems can be retrieved via systemctl status (applies to Linux distributions using systemd). There's also systemctl list-units but that's probably less relevant.

0

I highly recommend CFEngine Enterprise, which is an open-core product (open source community edition, closed source enterprise edition) which is free for up to 25 hosts connected to a single "hub."

CFEngine is built on a "pull" model. CFEngine 3 has been around since 2008, and has zero vulnerabilities listed in the National Vulnerabilities Database. (There are a very few vulnerabilities listed for CFEngine 1 and 2, but none for CFEngine 3 which was fully rewritten and greatly improved.)


While you can use CFEngine for configuration (its very name comes from "configuration engine" and it is the original configuration management software), it is still extremely useful even when used only for inventory.

Out-of-the-box details that are inventoried include:

  • Kernel version
  • OS flavor (e.g. RedHat 6.5)
  • Memory
  • CPU information
  • Disk utilization
  • Listening TCP ports
  • All software packages installed and all software updates available, with package versions and architectures
    • (Out of the box this works for apt and yum based systems; if you use something else you can use the package module API to write a CFEngine interface for another package management system in your language of choice.)

Plus, of course, you can write your own CFEngine policy to inventory whatever else you need to inventory.


CFEngine Core (the open source community product) handles server configuration, but doesn't have inventory built in (although you can hack something together if you really want to go to the trouble).

CFEngine Enterprise has a Postgres database built in (on the hub only, of course, not on the agents) which contains inventory and configuration compliance information for all connected hosts, and makes it available through a fairly full-featured web UI.


Note: I am not affiliated with the CFEngine company. I do deliver training in the use of CFEngine and have contributed to the open source CFEngine Core. I am biased in favor of CFEngine over other products (e.g. Puppet), but only because I honestly think it is a better product—not for financial reasons.

  • nota bena no relation to Adobe ColdFusion, which is what i assumed – cat Nov 8 '16 at 0:13
  • Downvoter, a comment would be welcome. (Or was that you, @cat?) – Wildcard Nov 8 '16 at 0:14
0

Note: whenever you're vague about what you're looking for (others, useful, general, etc.) you're going to have to decide what you mean for yourself.

What daemons are installed (www, db, others)

ls /etc/init.d
service --status-all
chkconfig --list
systemctl --all

Config locations for those services

ls /etc

What kernel and distro is the server running

uname -a

RAM

cat /proc/meminfo

CPU

cat /proc/cpuinfo

and disk space information
Mounted drives/paths

df -h

Information about my account: am I a sudoer, other usefull information

sudo -l
id
groups

General network information (blocked, or rather open ports)

ifconfig
ip addr
netstat -plunt

Installed interpreters/compilers and their versions (C, Python, etc.)

apt list --installed
yum list installed

X version and any DE installed

Xorg -version
ls /usr/share/xsessions/

If you want a single command that does everything, put all the above in a script.

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