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Im using Arch Linux and recently i tried to install a package using pacman.(Package Manager). Then I got a error : Partition / too full.

And i found that my root (/) partition (dev/sda1) is full. Below is the result of df -i and df -l

[srivinprabhash@burfy ~]$ df -i
Filesystem       Inodes  IUsed    IFree IUse% Mounted on
dev              252507    423   252084    1% /dev
run              253389    524   252865    1% /run
/dev/sda1       1310720 456051   854669   35% /
tmpfs            253389     14   253375    1% /dev/shm
tmpfs            253389     12   253377    1% /sys/fs/cgroup
tmpfs            253389     26   253363    1% /tmp
/dev/sda3      13697024 336383 13360641    3% /home
tmpfs            253389     16   253373    1% /run/user/1000

[srivinprabhash@burfy ~]$ df -l
Filesystem     1K-blocks     Used Available Use% Mounted on
dev              1010028        0   1010028   0% /dev
run              1013556      988   1012568   1% /run
/dev/sda1       20511356 20471732         0 100% /
tmpfs            1013556     1852   1011704   1% /dev/shm
tmpfs            1013556        0   1013556   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
tmpfs            1013556      592   1012964   1% /tmp
/dev/sda3      215462132 63482148 141012016  32% /home
tmpfs             202708       20    202688   1% /run/user/1000
[srivinprabhash@burfy ~]$

I have assigned 20G to dev/sda1 (/ partition) and 208G to dev/sda3 (home directory). I have used 32% of it. Now i need to resize my partitions and expand my root directory by adding space from home directory.

I found that its possible to do but i don't know how to do it exactly.

So my question is how to do it without losing data. ?

Update : here is the result of df -T

[srivinprabhash@fsociety ~]$ df -T
Filesystem     Type     1K-blocks     Used Available Use% Mounted on
dev            devtmpfs   1010028        0   1010028   0% /dev
run            tmpfs      1013556      988   1012568   1% /run
/dev/sda1      ext4      20511356 20471732         0 100% /
tmpfs          tmpfs      1013556     1852   1011704   1% /dev/shm
tmpfs          tmpfs      1013556        0   1013556   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
tmpfs          tmpfs      1013556      620   1012936   1% /tmp
/dev/sda3      ext4     215462132 63489092 141005072  32% /home
tmpfs          tmpfs       202708       20    202688   1% /run/user/1000
[srivinprabhash@fsociety ~]$ 

marked as duplicate by sam, GAD3R, grochmal, techraf, HalosGhost Oct 14 '16 at 22:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • you should include which type of filesystem is on sda1 using df -T, since expanding the partition is a twofold operation: increase size in partition table, increase the filesystem to cover the partition. Different filesystems will have different requirements. Usually the partition table changes can be done with fdisk – Centimane Oct 14 '16 at 15:22
  • Also, have you read through related questions for your answer? unix.stackexchange.com/search?q=resize+partition – Centimane Oct 14 '16 at 15:24
  • @Centimane Thanks for your reply. I updated the question with the result of df -T .. Im using ext4 filesystem. I dont know exactly how to do it with fdisk.Can your please describe. Will i lose my data Thanks ! – Srivin Prabhash Oct 14 '16 at 15:48
  • 1
    If you can tolerate downtime, you might have an easy go of it booting a live distribution that includes parted (or, if with a gui, gparted), which will allow you to resize your partitions as needed. As always when dealing with this sort of thing, ensure you have backups of your important data. – DopeGhoti Oct 14 '16 at 16:17
  • @Centimane That is absolutely not a duplicate. It only explains how to resize one partition, but transfering space from one filesystem on one partition to a filesystem on another partition requires a lot more than that. – Gilles Oct 14 '16 at 22:07

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