2

Searching through passed Logfile with something like this:

cat /path/to/logfile | grep -iEw 'some-ip-address-here|correspondig-mac-adress-here'

This gives me all the passed log lines until now so I can see what has been. Now I also want to see what's going on so I need to exchange cat with tail -f giving me this:

tail -f /path/to/logfile | grep -iEw 'some-ip-address-here|correspondig-mac-adress-here'
  • 2
    Probably none that are shorter than up-arrow, home key, 3*delete and type tail -f. – Julie Pelletier Jun 22 '16 at 7:35
  • home key does not work home key inserts a ~ maybe thats something i have change myself but i got used to it and don't wana miss it also in putty home button inserts a ~ and pressing 30 to 40 times left-arrow is definitly not short – konqui Jun 22 '16 at 8:02
  • 1
    Try CTRL-a instead of home key. – Michael Vehrs Jun 22 '16 at 8:49
5

You can use !!:* to refer to all the words but the zeroth of the last command line.

!! refers to the previous command, : separates the event specification from the word designator, * refers to all the words but the zeroth.

This is from the HISTORY EXPANSION section of bash(1).

wieland@host in ~» cat foo | grep bar
bar
wieland@host in ~» tail -f !!:*
tail -f foo | grep bar
bar

You could also use quick substitution where ^string1^string2^ repeats the last command, replacing string1 with string2:

wieland@host in ~» cat foo | grep bar
bar
wieland@host in ~» ^cat^tail -f
tail -f foo | grep bar
bar
  • what i use now is cat to tail !!:* and tail to cat !!:2-$ – konqui Jun 22 '16 at 10:08
1
  1. Press Up or Ctrl+P to recall the previous line. Repeat if you want the line before, etc.
  2. Press Home or Ctrl+A to go to the beginning of the line.
  3. Press Alt+D to delete the word under the cursor, i.e. the command you want to replace.
  4. Type the command you want to run now.
  5. Press Enter to run the command.

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