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I am trying to use nmap to scan a /119 IPv6 network. (512 addresses). Before I do this I want to generate a file that will populate all of the ip addresses in that range. The network info is as follows:

network 2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c00
Prefix length   119
network range   2607:f4a0:0003:0000:0250:56ff:feac:3c00-
                2607:f4a0:0003:0000:0250:56ff:feac:3dff

So I set my script up like this:

[root@ns1 ~]# for i in {1..512}; do printf "2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c00%x\n" $i >> ipv6.txt; done

What I expect to see in the file are 512 addresses that are within the range above. However what I see instead is this:

2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c001
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c002
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c003
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c004
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c005
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c006
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c007
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c008
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c009
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c00a
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c00b
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c00c
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c00d
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c00e
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c00f
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c0010
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c0011
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c0012
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c0013
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c0014
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c0015
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c0016
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c0017
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c0018
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c0019
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c001a
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c001b
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c001c

When I go to run nmap I get errors:

nmap -Pn -sT -p 22 -6 -iL ipv6.txt > ipv6up

Errors:

Failed to resolve given IPv6 hostname/IP:    2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c00200.  Note that you can't use '/mask' or   '[1-4,7,100-]' style ranges for IPv6.

How can I fix this?

2 Answers 2

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for i in {15360..15871}; do printf "2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:%.4x\n" $i; done

Output:

2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c00
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c01
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c02
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3c03
.
.
.
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3dfd
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3dfe
2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3dff
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  • awesome. can you please explain your changes compared to what I was trying to run and why they are needed?
    – user53029
    May 26, 2016 at 18:53
  • I replaced 3c00%x by %.4x to use always four digits and changed range in loop from 1..512 to 15360..15871.
    – Cyrus
    May 26, 2016 at 18:56
  • Thanks but why did the numbers in the range loop need to be changed? What if I wanted to scan a /118 (1024 IP's)? What would the scan range look like?
    – user53029
    May 26, 2016 at 18:59
  • 2
    If you find it more convenient, you could keep the 1..512 range (well, more sensibly, 0..511) and add an appropriate offset e.g. for i in {0..511}; do printf "2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:%.4x\n" $((i+0x3c00)); done May 26, 2016 at 19:06
  • @steeldriver: Thanks, that makes it easier to use.
    – Cyrus
    May 26, 2016 at 19:19
1

You were almost there. The line should look like this:

for i in {3072..3583};do printf "2607:f4a0:3:0:250:56ff:feac:3%x\n" $i >> ipv6.txt;done

Explanation: It seems that you assumed, printf would somehow add the numbers you fed it to the number before the placeholder. This is not how it works. What printf does is interpret whatever is not a placeholder as a string and then convert the input you give it to a string (how the conversion is done depends on the placeholder you use) and replace the placeholder with that. So printf "bla bla%x" 8 bcomes bla bla8 and printf "500%x" 8 becomes 5008

Therefore, you need to replace the last 3 digits with the placeholder %x and then give it the decimal numbers corresponding to the hex range c00-dff which is 3072-3583 in decimal (unfortunately the bash range operator does not understand hex numbers).

By the way, If you want to start counting from a number with less than 3 digits, you can also specify a padding for the placeholder. for example for the numbers 000-200 you would use the placeholder %03x. 0 is the character you want to use for padding numbers with less than 3 digits and 3 is the minimum length of digits you want to have.

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