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I prefer using English locales for my system, but have to use some old Unicode-unaware Russian and Czech applications. In Windows I could set a locale for such applications in a separate Control Panel place. How can I configure this in Linux/Wine?

2 Answers 2

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The idea is to set LANG only for this application.

If you start the application from the command line, write something like alias yourapp="export LANG=ru_RU.utf8 /usr/bin/yourapp" in ~/.bashrc.

If you start the application with a GUI button, you can edit the corresponding desktop file, i.e. open ~/.gnome2/panel2.d/default/launchers/yourapp.desktop in a text editor and change the line Exec=/usr/bin/yourapp %F to Exec=sh -c "LANG=ru_RU.utf8 /usr/bin/foo %F"

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Did you try setting LANG variable? I don't know the Czech setting, Russian should be ru_RU.utf8 at least that's what I'd use.

See what your current locale settings are:

% locale
LANG=en_US.utf8
LC_CTYPE="en_US.utf8"
LC_NUMERIC="en_US.utf8"
LC_TIME="en_US.utf8"
LC_COLLATE="en_US.utf8"
LC_MONETARY="en_US.utf8"
LC_MESSAGES="en_US.utf8"
LC_PAPER="en_US.utf8"
LC_NAME="en_US.utf8"
LC_ADDRESS="en_US.utf8"
LC_TELEPHONE="en_US.utf8"
LC_MEASUREMENT="en_US.utf8"
LC_IDENTIFICATION="en_US.utf8"
LC_ALL=

If your locales are installed correctly, setting LANG should set all other variables. I cannot guarantee, that this will work in conjunction with WINE, though.

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  • 2
    I want my system locale to be English. Despite being a Russian, I hate localised applications UIs and using a comma as a decimal fraction separator. I only want to tweak an ANSI codepage for Wine apps.
    – Ivan
    Oct 4, 2010 at 7:52

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