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I have a laptop I'm setting up to multi-boot between Win 7, Solaris 11, Ubuntu 14.04, and CentOS 7. I have a common FAT32 partition for all of them to save data to. I'm less familiar with Solaris and haven't used it in years, and am really struggling :-)

'format' says:

AVAILABLE DISK SELECTIONS:
   0. c2t0d0 <ATA-Samsung SSD 850-2B6Q cyl 5013 alt 2 hd 224 sec 56>
      /pci@0,0/pci1028,49a@1f,2/disk@0,0

partition> print
Current partition table (original):
Total disk cylinders available: 5013 + 2 (reserved cylinders)

Part      Tag    Flag     Cylinders        Size            Blocks
0       root    wm       1 - 5014       29.99GB    (5014/0/0) 62895616
1 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
2     backup    wu       0 - 5014       30.00GB    (5015/0/0) 62908160
3 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
4 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
5 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
6 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
7 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0
8       boot    wu       0 -    0        6.12MB    (1/0/0)       12544
9 unassigned    wm       0               0         (0/0/0)           0

                                           Cylinders
  Partition   Status    Type          Start   End   Length    %
  =========   ======    ============  =====   ===   ======   ===
      1                 IFS: NTFS         0    16      17      0
      2                 IFS: NTFS        16  5015    5000     13
      3       Active    Solaris2       5016  10030    5015     13
      4                 EXT-DOS        10031  39868    29838     75

I cannot for the life of me find the correct device ID. /dev/dsk/c2t0d0p0:4, c2t0d0p4:1, c2t0d0p4:e, nothing. Under Linux, it's /dev/sda10

Output of 'df -k'

Filesystem           1024-blocks        Used   Available Capacity  Mounted on
rpool/ROOT/solaris      30707712     4959478    18800914    21%    /
/devices                       0           0           0     0%    /devices
/dev                           0           0           0     0%    /dev
ctfs                           0           0           0     0%        /system/contract
proc                           0           0           0     0%    /proc
mnttab                         0           0           0     0%    /etc/mnttab
swap                     7819364        1684     7817680     1%    /system/volatile
objfs                          0           0           0     0%    /system/object
sharefs                        0           0           0     0%    /etc/dfs/sharetab
/usr/lib/libc/libc_hwcap1.so.1
                    23760392     4959478    18800914    21%    /lib/libc.so.1
fd                             0           0           0     0%    /dev/fd
rpool/ROOT/solaris/var
                    30707712      265627    18800914     2%    /var
swap                     7948816      131136     7817680     2%    /tmp
rpool/VARSHARE          30707712          62    18800914     1%    /var/share
rpool/export            30707712          32    18800914     1%    /export
rpool/export/home       30707712          32    18800914     1%    /export/home
rpool/export/home/joliver
                    30707712        7922    18800914     1%    /export/home/joliver
rpool                   30707712        4967    18800914     1%    /rpool
rpool/VARSHARE/zones    30707712          31    18800914     1%    /system/zones
rpool/VARSHARE/pkg      30707712          32    18800914     1%    /var/share/pkg
rpool/VARSHARE/pkg/repositories
                    30707712          31    18800914     1%    /var/share/pkg/repositories
  • What's the output from df -k /? – Andrew Henle Mar 7 '16 at 11:14
  • Pasted, even though since this slice isn't mounted, it isn't going to show up... ;-) – John Oliver Mar 9 '16 at 15:05
1

What you are looking for is the following:

format -> select the desired disks -> fdisk

Solaris on x86 uses a partition to create its own partition style(slices). So, from Windows and Linux you will see one partition type Solaris and the rest of the other partitions. Under Solaris you will see only the Solaris partition unless you use the fdisk command. From there you can take the id of the partition you are looking for.

To make sure that you will be mounting the correct one, you can always make and initial test with fstyp command

fstyp /dev/dsk/c1t0d0pX where X is the partition id.

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