3

I'm using Redhat Linux 6.5 and would like to see the disk latencies for the used disks.

Using iostat I get the columns await and svctm ( including %util ). But according to the man page of iostat the columns svctm are obsolete and should not be used any more .

So what can I use to see the disk latencies for my disks.

6

You can use iostat -x and check for the await column - per device it shows the total time spent waiting plus the actual handling of the request by the disk. The units here are milli-seconds.

$ iostat -yzx 5
Linux 2.6.32-642.13.1.el6.x86_64 (vagrant1)     04/01/2017      _x86_64_        (1 CPU)

avg-cpu:  %user   %nice %system %iowait  %steal   %idle
           0.00    0.00    0.20    0.00    0.00   99.80

Device:         rrqm/s   wrqm/s     r/s     w/s   rsec/s   wsec/s avgrq-sz avgqu-sz   await r_await w_await  svctm  %util
sda               0.00     0.20    0.00    2.20     0.00    19.24     8.73     0.00    2.00    0.00    2.00   0.45   0.10
dm-0              0.00     0.00    0.00    2.40     0.00    19.24     8.00     0.01    2.17    0.00    2.17   0.42   0.10

You can also use sar -d. Again the await column shows avg request latency in ms.

$ sar -d
04:50:01 PM       DEV       tps  rd_sec/s  wr_sec/s  avgrq-sz  avgqu-sz     await     svctm     %util
05:00:01 PM    dev8-0      0.12      0.00      0.92      7.67      0.00      1.21      0.90      0.01
05:00:01 PM  dev253-0      0.12      0.00      0.92      8.00      0.00      1.45      0.94      0.01
05:00:01 PM  dev253-1      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00
05:10:01 PM    dev8-0      0.14      0.00      1.07      7.90      0.00      1.05      0.80      0.01
05:10:01 PM  dev253-0      0.13      0.00      1.07      8.00      0.00      1.18      0.81      0.01
05:10:01 PM  dev253-1      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00
05:20:01 PM    dev8-0      0.11      0.00      0.79      7.26      0.00      1.52      1.05      0.01
05:20:01 PM  dev253-0      0.10      0.00      0.79      8.00      0.00      2.19      1.15      0.01
05:20:01 PM  dev253-1      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00
05:30:01 PM    dev8-0      0.12      0.00      0.97      7.89      0.00      1.22      0.93      0.01
05:30:01 PM  dev253-0      0.12      0.00      0.97      8.00      0.00      1.42      0.95      0.01
05:30:01 PM  dev253-1      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00
05:40:01 PM    dev8-0      0.12      0.00      0.84      7.20      0.00      0.96      0.77      0.01
05:40:01 PM  dev253-0      0.11      0.00      0.84      8.00      0.00      1.19      0.86      0.01
05:40:01 PM  dev253-1      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00
05:50:01 PM    dev8-0      0.11      0.00      0.84      7.75      0.00      1.31      0.94      0.01
05:50:01 PM  dev253-0      0.11      0.00      0.84      8.00      0.00      2.03      0.97      0.01
05:50:01 PM  dev253-1      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00
2

You can use sar command.

root@virt01:~# sar 1 1
Linux 3.19.0-42-generic (virt01.ubuntu.com)     13/02/16        _x86_64_        (1 CPU)

12:19:55        CPU     %user     %nice   %system   %iowait    %steal     %idle
12:19:56        all      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00    100.00
Average:        all      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00      0.00    100.00
root@virt01:~#

In Ubuntu installation process

sudo apt-get install sysstat
 sed -i 's/ENABLED="false"/ENABLED="true"/' /etc/default/sysstat
 /etc/init.d/sysstat start
  • 1
    How do you show disk latencies using sar? – Mat Feb 13 '16 at 7:26
  • 1
    You need to specify the -d option to sar – Henk Langeveld Apr 1 '17 at 21:26

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.