1

No AUR, no PKG.

I want to install Bro, listed in Arch's "List of applications". But I can't find it in AUR, and it doesn't have a PKGBUILD file.


To make, or to makepkg?

It does however have a Makefile, and a config shell-script. But after reading through them, I'm not convinced this is compatible with the Arch philosophy.

Is it recommended that I make a PKGBUILD, or is there another way to install it correctly? What is best practice?


FYI:

I know that how to get it to work, more or less. I want to do this the Arch Way. Not to simply hack it together. I want to really learn how Linux works.

closed as off-topic by Stephen Kitt, garethTheRed, dr01, Jakuje, vonbrand Feb 11 '16 at 18:01

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

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1

If you want to learn how Linux works, then you would typically install it from source with something like

./configure
make
sudo make install

If you want to do it the Arch way, make a PKGBUILD and share it on the AUR, so others don't have to go through the hassle of installing it from source. Your PKGBUILD will contain the same steps as if you install it from source. Hence it will contain something like

build(){
    cd "${pkgname}-${pkgver}"
    ./configure
    make
}

package(){
    cd "${pkgname}-${pkgver}"
    make DESTDIR="${pkgdir}" install
}

So in any way you want to install it from source first, to make sure it works. See the excellent Arch wiki for more information about the PKGBUILD.

  • Seems like a good solution. I'll see if I can help the community with that package. Thanks! – Payne Feb 12 '16 at 12:35
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    @Payne The disadvantage of the first way (manually running make install) is that it will install untracked files through your system, making uninstallation difficult. If you use a PKGBUILD, then the package manager knows about the installation, and it is trivial to uninstall/upgrade/etc. later. – Sparhawk Aug 21 '18 at 2:43

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