3

I'm on Xfce desktop environment, using "Task manager 1.0.1". For more precision you can found it here, a link I got in the "About".

When secondary clicking a process, I can stop it, kill it or terminate it. I need to know a precise definition of each of those terms for this application.

1

Use the source:

switch (xtm_signal)
{
    case XTM_SIGNAL_TERMINATE:
        sig = SIGTERM;
        break;
    case XTM_SIGNAL_STOP:
        sig = SIGSTOP;
        break;
    case XTM_SIGNAL_CONTINUE:
        sig = SIGCONT;
        break;
    case XTM_SIGNAL_KILL:
        sig = SIGKILL;
        break;
    default:
        return TRUE;
}

You can see that the task manager sends corresponding SIGSTOP (like a controlZ), SIGTERM (like controlC) and SIGKILL (like kill -9).

Further reading:

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  • Ctrl-c usually sends a SIGINT, not a SIGTERM. – RealSkeptic Feb 8 '16 at 15:39
  • This is useful to me because I've never thought of reading the code until now even if that's the reason I switched to Linux. What can I study, if I have free time, to understand better Linux source code (not the kernel, that seems complicated)? – Santropedro Feb 8 '16 at 15:44
3

It sends different stop signals to a process. Here's some info:

  • Stop: SIGSTOP - This signal makes the operating system pause a process's execution. The process cannot ignore the signal.

  • Kill: SIGKILL - The SIGKILL signal forces the process to stop executing immediately. The program cannot ignore this signal. This process does not get to clean-up either.

  • Terminate: SIGTERM - This signal requests a process to stop running. This signal can be ignored. The process is given time to gracefully shutdown. When a program gracefully shuts down, that means it is given time to save its progress and release resources. In other words, it is not forced to stop. SIGINT is very similar to SIGTERM.

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