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There's a Linux machine where files are owned by a user named "lab" with a UID of 1000 (on the system). There's another Linux machine where files are owned by a user named "user" with a UID of 500 (on the system).

How do I make a NFS mount so the files that are owned by "lab"/UID-1000 on the server are seen as owned by "user"/UID-500 on the client?

I can do this using a SSHFS mount, or even a CIFS mount, but SSHFS/CIFS breaks in other ways that I would rather not have to deal with.

Does NFS not support this use case atall?

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I used the kernel-based NFS server following this article, the following worked:

On the server, I used the following options:

rw,sync,no_acl,all_squash,anonuid=1000,anongid=1000

On the client, I used the following options:

-o rw,sync,vers=3,hard,intr,nolock,tcp,noac

and I have write permissions, even though UID/GID/Username don't match!

  • do we have any idea why these settings work? what do they all mean? – jerlich Aug 19 at 6:43

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