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I have this problem with my laptop running Debian Jessie.

I cannot gain any kind of network visibility on it from devices in the same network. I can't ARP the laptop, but the strangest thing is that if I ping from the laptop going out to somewhere else on the network, -then- I can communicate properly with the laptop from the same host that the laptop pinged, for a short period of time.

My laptop can ping anywhere out onto the network, but can't be pinged unless it pings first.

All devices are on the same subnet, share the same default gateway.

Using Wireshark shows me that it literally is not receiving any ARP requests from anywhere on the network. My computer isn't detecting the request.

My iptables have no restrictions, so it can't be a firewall problem.

My router also has the lowest security values.

I'm convinced that it's somehow related to

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2172373 ,

because that post exhibits exactly the same symptoms as my own setup, although that one specifically references Ubuntu's broadcom drivers, while I'm using Debian's Atheros drivers.

The output of lspci -knn shows network/driver setup:

 04:00.0 Network controller [0280]: Qualcomm Atheros AR928X Wireless Network Adapter (PCI-Express) [168c:002a] (rev 01)
 Subsystem: Quanta Microsystems, Inc EM303 802.11bgn Wireless Mini PCIe Card [AR9281] [1a32:0303]
 Kernel driver in use: ath9k

Is this an issue with Debian? Is there any process I can do to fix it? I'm not too familiar/knowledgeable as far as handling drivers in Linux.

EDIT:

After uninstalling the network-manager package, the system ceases to have this problem. I've read reports of strange things happening when both the network-manager and the wicd packages co exist on the same system. I'm still observing the system now, but as of the current moment, everything seems to be functional.

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If I ping from the laptop going out to somewhere else on the network, -then- I can communicate properly with the laptop from the same host that the laptop pinged, for a short period of time.

and this:

My laptop can ping anywhere out onto the network, but can't be pinged unless it pings first.

I see that you went to great lengths to show that it's not the network (routers, wires,configuration, etc), but for all the world, this makes me think that you've got a misbehaving or misconfigured router in front of your laptop. I say this because without ARP at all, you wouldn't be able to even have that short period of connectivity.

If I were trying to troubleshoot this I'd ping a host, ssh into that host in the short period of time, and then do an arp -a on both my laptop and that host to see what's going on. Doing a traceroute in both directions might also help, as might a couple of non-standard tools, arping and hping. You say that everything is on the same subnet, so arping working or not would convince you of your ARP-not-working theory. Since regular ping uses ICMP packets, arping checks connectivity using a different protocol. hping (or maybe hping3) lets you use UDP or TCP to do the same connectivity check. The traceroute (in both directions) would show if IP packets take the same route through wires and routers in both directions.

  • The problem's resolved itself. Looks to be some strange conflict happening between two different network manager applications. – steelmonkey Oct 22 '15 at 13:56

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