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I am having trouble mounting a LVM to extract a Proxmox virtual machines data. Any ideas on how I can mount it?

root@rescue:~# mount /dev/sdd /mnt/
mount: block device /dev/sdd is write-protected, mounting read-only
NTFS signature is missing.
Failed to mount '/dev/sdd': Invalid argument
The device '/dev/sdd' doesn't seem to have a valid NTFS.
Maybe the wrong device is used? Or the whole disk instead of a
partition (e.g. /dev/sda, not /dev/sda1)? Or the other way around?
root@rescue:~# mount /dev/sdd1 /mnt/
mount: unknown filesystem type 'linux_raid_member'
root@rescue:~#

Disk info

root@rescue:~# fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 240.1 GB, 240057409536 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 29185 cylinders, total 468862128 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x000bf890

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *        4096    40962047    20478976   83  Linux
/dev/sda2        40962048    43057151     1047552   82  Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda3        43057152   468854783   212898816    f  W95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/sda5        43059200   468854783   212897792   8e  Linux LVM

Disk /dev/sdc: 2000.4 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
81 heads, 63 sectors/track, 765633 cylinders, total 3907029168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x35f0e73a

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdc1            2048  3907029167  1953513560   8e  Linux LVM

Disk /dev/sdd: 2000.4 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
81 heads, 63 sectors/track, 765633 cylinders, total 3907029168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x43bc6360

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdd1            2048  3907029167  1953513560   8e  Linux LVM

Disk /dev/sdb: 240.1 GB, 240057409536 bytes
81 heads, 63 sectors/track, 91879 cylinders, total 468862128 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xf95db8ab

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdb1            2048   468862127   234430040   8e  Linux LVM

Disk /dev/mapper/pve-data: 453.8 GB, 453760778240 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 55166 cylinders, total 886251520 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/mapper/pve-data doesn't contain a valid partition table
root@rescue:~#

enter image description here

  • do you have the lvm2 tools installed? if not, then that's the first thing you need to do. it's available pre-packaged for most distros...e.g. on debian, run apt-get install lvm2 – cas Sep 30 '15 at 3:00
  • Yes it's installed – Teddy291 Sep 30 '15 at 3:23
1

That partition has the type “Linux LVM”, so it is presumably an LVM physical volume. Use file -s /dev/sdd1 to check.

Run the command pvs to see a summary of the physical volumes that are available on your system, or pvdisplay to see more detailed information. If you think that some physical volumes are present but not detected, run pvscan to scan all connected disks for potential LVM volumes.

In the VG column of the pvs output, you see the volume group to which the physical volume belongs to. If a volume group is spread over multiple physical volumes, all physical volumes need to be present (except in RAID appropriate configurations). Run vgs to see a summary of the available volume groups, or vgdisplay to see more detailed information.

The content of LVM areas is accessed through logical volumes. Run lvs to see a summary of the available volume groups, or lvdisplay to see more detailed information. In order to access a logical volume, it must be active, which lvs reports with an a in the “Attr” column. If the volume hasn't been activated automatically, do so with lvchange -ay mygroup/myvolume where mygroup is the volume group name and myvolume is the logical volume name. You can also use vgchange -ay mygroup to activate all the logical volumes in a group.

To mount an active logical volume, refer to it by its device path, which is /dev/mapper/mygroup-myvolume or /dev/mygroup/myvolume.

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