35

I get access to some xeon machines for checking performance. I want to find out what architecture they are using such as Haswell, Sandybridge , Ivybridge. Is there a command to find this out?

  • 3
    /proc/cpuinfo actually gives the model name like Intel (R) blah blah blah GHz, you should google it directly. – Arthur2e5 Sep 18 '15 at 21:50
  • I was asking for architecture family – a curious engineer Sep 18 '15 at 22:07
  • 3
    I don't think the “architecture family” is reported, they're just commercial names. You get the model name in /proc/cpuinfo, I think it's up to you to translate that into the corresponding family name. – Gilles 'SO- stop being evil' Sep 18 '15 at 22:30
  • @Ijustwanttocode You have to use some kind of table to look up those commercial names. – Arthur2e5 Sep 19 '15 at 0:24
51

It's a bit of a cheap workaround but you could get that info from gcc ! I'll explain : gcc is able to optimize binaries for each subarch with the -march option. Moreover, it is able to detect yours and automatically optimize for your machine with -march=native Assuming so, you just have to call gcc with march=native and ask it what flags it would use : in short

gcc -march=native -Q --help=target|grep march

for me it gives

-march=                               bdver1

but my pc runs with an amd buldozer processor

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    your solution answers the question. It works for me. – AJN Oct 9 '17 at 17:20
  • This doesn't work for me as it returns broadwell instead of kabylake. This is probably because my version of gcc doesn't distinguish those two families when generating assembly. – Tyilo Jan 13 '18 at 5:35
  • gcc8 can identify skylake as such whereas gcc5 identifies as broadwell, indeed. – Eric Aug 12 '18 at 17:00
17

This data is stored in PMU_NAME, just type:

cat /sys/devices/cpu/caps/pmu_name
haswell
|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    This is really the easiest solution and I believe the best answer, as it does not require any additional commands (like gcc or pup) to be installed and it gives a clean output of just the name of the microarchitecture, which can be used directly in a script. – ChrisW Dec 24 '19 at 10:01
  • This gives skylake on my machine, whereas Intel's site says it is kaby lake : ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/97185/… says – Tyilo Dec 26 '19 at 16:58
9

You probably can't because those are marketing names for commercial sale, not the "technical" name.

You can, however, obtain what you need from dmidecode and then visit http://ark.intel.com (for your Xeon processor) to determine the commercial family.

[root@mediasrv ~]# dmidecode|grep -i intel
        Socket Designation: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-3770 CPU @ 3.40GHz
        Manufacturer: Intel
        Version: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-3770 CPU @ 3.40GHz

From that output, I could visit Intel's ark website and search for the 3770 CPU, which would tell me I have an Ivy Bridge chip.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    To do it automated with a script i would use dmidecode or /proc/cpuinfo and combine it with grep or awk or perl and the printable version of the xeon cpu list on wikipedia which you get with curl or wget: en.wikipedia.org/w/… – erik Sep 19 '15 at 22:23
7

Note: This script doesn't work anymore. Intel's search URL has changed.

Below is a bash script that automatically finds the architecture code name for your CPU using /proc/cpuinfo and https://ark.intel.com/. To work it requires that you have pup installed.

Running the code on my computer I get the following result:

$ ./intel_codename
Processor name: i7-7700HQ
Kaby Lake

#!/bin/bash

set -euo pipefail

if [[ $# == 0 ]]; then
    modelname=$(cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep 'model name' | head -1)
    if ! grep Intel <<<"$modelname" > /dev/null; then
        echo "You don't seem to have an Intel processor" >&2
        exit 1
    fi

    name=$(sed 's/.*\s\(\S*\) CPU.*/\1/' <<<"$modelname")
    echo "Processor name: $name" >&2
else
    name=$1
fi

links=($(curl --silent "https://ark.intel.com/search?q=$name" | pup '.result-title a attr{href}'))

results=${#links[@]}
if [[ $results == 0 ]]; then
    echo "No results found" >&2
    exit 1
fi

link=${links[0]}
if [[ $results != 1 ]]; then
    echo "Warning: $results results found" >&2
    echo "Using: $link" >&2
fi

url="https://ark.intel.com$link"
codename=$(curl --silent "$url" | pup '.CodeNameText .value text{}' | xargs | sed 's/Products formerly //')

echo "$codename"
|improve this answer|||||
  • It works and does what @erik suggested! – Panayotis Jan 31 '18 at 16:06
  • my /proc/cpuinfo contains "model name : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU @ 2.00GHz", so this script doesn't work – Bryan Larsen Dec 12 '19 at 20:40
  • A disadvantage is, that it requires 'pup' to be installed. After installing pup, it still fails without completing the script. Tested on GRML in 2019. – ChrisW Dec 24 '19 at 10:06
  • It is indeed true that this doesn't work anymore. There doesn't seem to be an easy way to fix this. – Tyilo Dec 26 '19 at 16:55
1

On the cloud none of the above answers work for me. I have a model name of "Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU @ 2.00GHz", dmidecode tells me that Google made the processors, et cetera.

/proc/cpuinfo "cpu family" and "model" help quite a bit. They're unique for almost all combinations and can be looked up on https://en.wikichip.org/wiki/intel/cpuid. However family 6 model 85 is both skylake and cascade lake.

|improve this answer|||||
0

Attempted to fix the script that @Tyilo posted earlier. The updated version is below.

#!/bin/bash

set -euo pipefail

if [[ $# == 0 ]]; then
    modelname=$(cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep 'model name' | head -1)
    if ! grep Intel <<<"$modelname" > /dev/null; then
        echo "You don't seem to have an Intel processor" >&2
        exit 1
    fi

    name=$(sed 's/.*CPU\s\(.*\)\s\(@\).*/\1/' <<<"$modelname")
    echo "Processor name: $name" >&2
    name=${name// /'%20'}
else
    name=$1
fi

links=($(curl --silent "https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/search.html?_charset_=UTF-8&q=$name" | pup '#FormRedirectUrl attr{value}'))

results=${#links[@]}
if [[ $results == 0 ]]; then
    echo "No results found" >&2
    exit 1
fi

link=${links[0]}
if [[ $results != 1 ]]; then
    echo "Warning: $results results found" >&2
    echo "Using: $link" >&2
fi

url="https://ark.intel.com$link"
codename=$(curl --silent "$url" | pup 'span[data-key="CodeNameText"] text{}' | xargs | sed 's/Products formerly //')

echo "$codename"

Running the updated script on my server I get the following result:

$ ./intel_codename 
Processor name: E3-1225 v5
Skylake

Not an expert at all. Just learned how to use curl and pup in the last hour or so. Didn't test it on others except my own machine.

Update: Did some more testing. The script should work for Xeon Processor family. However it breaks (showing No results found) if Intel Ark database query returns multiple results. For example for Xeon Platinum 8260, it will return 8260 and all its variants such as 8260M. Also, if the name (processor numbering) happens to be used in other products or key data fields, multiple results will be returned from the query and the script won't find the result. It also breaks for those version 0 processor, such as Xeon E5-2690 0.

For Intel Core Processor family (i7, i5, etc), you need to replace sed command with the original one by @Tyilo, see below.

name=$(sed 's/.*\s\(\S*\) CPU.*/\1/' <<<"$modelname")

Again, if query returns multiple results. This simple script won't be able to parse correct and yields No results found.

|improve this answer|||||
0

I'm currently working in server land. My script works on at least more recent servers. To differentiate between skylake and cascade lake servers is not pretty... it uses the /proc/cpuinfo 'model name' field to tease out skylake vs cascade lake.

#!/bin/bash
# cascade lake 2nd gen stuff from https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/products/docs/processors/xeon/2nd-gen-xeon-scalable-spec-update.html
# 2nd gen xeon scalable cpus: cascade lake sku is 82xx, 62xx, 52xx, 42xx 32xx W-32xx  from https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/products/docs/processors/xeon/2nd-gen-xeon-scalable-spec-update.html
# skylake 1st gen stuff from https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/processors/xeon/scalable/xeon-scalable-spec-update.html
# 1st gen xeon scalable cpus: 81xx, 61xx, 51xx, 81xxT, 61xxT 81xxF, 61xxF, 51xx, 41xx, 31xx, 51xxT 41xxT, 51xx7, 
CPU_NAME=`cat /proc/cpuinfo | awk '
  function decode_fam_mod(vndor, fam, mod, mod_nm) {
    if (vndor == "GenuineIntel") {
      # cpuid tables from https://en.wikichip.org/wiki/intel/cpuid
      dcd[1,1]="Ice Lake";              dcd[1,2] ="Family 6 Model 108";
      dcd[2,1]="Ice Lake";              dcd[2,2] ="Family 6 Model 106";
      dcd[3,1]="Cascade Lake/Skylake";  dcd[3,2] ="Family 6 Model 85"; # 06_55h  Intel always does the hex fam_model
      dcd[4,1]="Broadwell";             dcd[4,2] ="Family 6 Model 79"; # 06_4fh
      dcd[5,1]="Broadwell";             dcd[5,2] ="Family 6 Model 86"; # 06_56h
      dcd[6,1]="Haswell";               dcd[6,2] ="Family 6 Model 63"; # 06_3fh
      dcd[7,1]="Ivy Bridge";            dcd[7,2] ="Family 6 Model 62";
      dcd[8,1]="Sandy Bridge";          dcd[8,2] ="Family 6 Model 45"; # 06_2dh
      dcd[9,1]="Westmere";              dcd[9,2] ="Family 6 Model 44";
      dcd[10,1]="EX";                   dcd[10,2]="Family 6 Model 47";
      dcd[11,1]="Nehalem";              dcd[11,2]="Family 6 Model 46";
      dcd[12,1]="Lynnfield";            dcd[12,2]="Family 6 Model 30";
      dcd[13,1]="Bloomfield, EP, WS";   dcd[13,2]="Family 6 Model 26";
      dcd[14,1]="Penryn";               dcd[14,2]="Family 6 Model 29";
      dcd[15,1]="Harpertown, QC, Wolfdale, Yorkfield";  dcd[15,2]="Family 6 Model 23";
      str = "Family " fam " Model " mod;
      #printf("str= %s\n", str);
      res=" ";
      for(k=1;k <=15;k++) { if (dcd[k,2] == str) {res=dcd[k,1];break;}}
      if (k == 3) {
        # so Cooper Lake/Cascade Lake/SkyLake)
        if (match(mod_nm, / [86543]2[0-9][0-9]/) > 0) { res="Cascade Lake";} else
        if (match(mod_nm, / [86543]1[0-9][0-9]/) > 0) { res="Skylake";}
      }
      return res;
    }
  }
  /^vendor_id/ {
    vndr=$(NF);
  }
  /^cpu family/ {
    fam=$(NF);
  }
  /^model/ {
    if ($2 == ":") {
      mod=$(NF);
    }
  }
  /^model name/ {
#model name : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-2620 v4 @ 2.10GHz
    n=split($0, arr, ":");
    mod_nm = arr[2];
    #printf("vndr= %s, fam= %s, mod= %s, mod_nm= %s\n", vndr, fam, mod, mod_nm);
    cpu_name=decode_fam_mod(vndr, fam, mod, mod_nm);
    printf("%s\n", cpu_name);
    exit;
  }
'`
echo "cpu uarch= $CPU_NAME"

This doesn't handle the client cpus... but it should be relatively straight forward to take the client cpuid info from WikiChip and expand the list.

|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.