3

I've recently installed Mint Linux, and when I try to login in the GUI it gives the following error message

your home directory is listed as /home/username but does not appear to exist

Then when I click OK appears this message

User's $HOME/.dmrc file is being ignored

And then it tells me that it cannot make login and forces me to log off.

What do I do?

  • @PedroMendes gave an incomplete answer. When a new user is added, his home directory is endowed with a small number of files and directories, some of them hidden. They can be found in /etc/skel, and be copied over to the new home directory. Pedro's answer missed this. – MariusMatutiae Sep 17 '15 at 8:46
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So, let's create the username home folder then. To do that just follow this steps:

1 - On the login menu press Ctrl + Alt + F1 to open the terminal
2 - Log in with your user
3 - Execute the commands

sudo mkdir /home/username
sudo chown username /home/username

4 - Then press Ctrl + Alt + F8 to return to the GUI

Hopefully now you can login :)



Edit

Thanks to @MariusMatutiae for this aditional step

When a new user is added, his home directory is endowed with a small number of files and directories, some of them hidden. They can be found in /etc/skel, and be copied over to the new home directory.

After you login for the first time, open a terminal window and type the following command:

cp -a /etc/skel/. /home/username

This will copy all the files inside skel to the username folder.

  • 1
    Wouldn't you need root permissions to add to /home? Also, you'd probably want to change the group ownership for this new directory, i.e. sudo chown username: /home/username. – Sparhawk Sep 16 '15 at 23:00
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If you can see your home directory listed in '/' using root-shell in recovery mode, then this might help.

Boot into linux mint recovery mode, then go to root-shell prompt. As it loads the file system in read only mode, you need to remount it with read/write permission, use the following command.

mount -o rw,remount /

after it remounts try these commands and login using your username.

chown root:root /home
chown -R username:username /home/username

(replace 'username' with your own details of course.)

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