2

To explain a little, I am currently monitoring a folder for any changes and when changes are detected it simply uploads the detected files to my server via rsync. This is working without any issues :

#!/bin/bash
time_stamp=$(date +"%B-%d-%Y")
inotifywait -mr /usr/lib/unifi-video/data/videos -e create -e moved_to |
  while read path action file; do
  echo "The file '$file' appeared in directory '$path' via '$action'"
  rsync -avz -e "ssh -p 221" /$path/$file [email protected]:~/"$time_stamp"/ 
done

I found most of that script here : Script to monitor folder for new files?

Question : I am trying to add the following CURL line to the script above, but as multiple files are being detected at once it is also executing the CURL line multiple times. I am attempting to find a method to prevent the CURL line from being executed more than once when multiple files are detected?

curl http://textbelt.com/text -d number=XXXXXXX -d "message=Motion Detected";

I have tried adding it as a new line directly under the rsync command, as well as using && after the rsync command. Both methods executed the CURL command multiple times.

Example of what I tried :

#!/bin/bash
time_stamp=$(date +"%B-%d-%Y")
inotifywait -mr /usr/lib/unifi-video/data/videos -e create -e moved_to |
  while read path action file; do
  echo "The file '$file' appeared in directory '$path' via '$action'"
  rsync -avz -e "ssh -p 221" /$path/$file [email protected]:~/"$time_stamp"/ 
  curl http://textbelt.com/text -d number=XXXXXXX -d "message=Motion Detected";
done

Example of the output :

The file 'test30' appeared in directory '/usr/lib/unifi-video/data/videos/' via 'CREATE'
sending incremental file list

sent 39 bytes  received 11 bytes  20.00 bytes/sec
total size is 0  speedup is 0.00

{
"success": true
}

The file 'test31' appeared in directory '/usr/lib/unifi-video/data/videos/' via 'CREATE'
sending incremental file list

sent 39 bytes  received 11 bytes  20.00 bytes/sec
total size is 0  speedup is 0.00

{
 "success": true
}

The two "success" lines show the CURL command has been executed twice, after each detection and upload.

Please let me know if I forgot to include any information...

4
  • 1
    How do you define "multiple files are being detected at once"? I think you need to implement a kind of timeout to determine whether or not to run CURL on each update.
    – yaegashi
    Jul 20, 2015 at 21:24
  • You'd probably be better off with close_write instead of create Jul 20, 2015 at 22:24
  • Since you're using rsync, why does it matter if you run it multiple times in quick succession? Jul 20, 2015 at 22:25
  • I probably should have explained further, but this is for a security camera system that creates multiple video files, and these are the files that are being detected/monitored and then uploaded via rsync to my server. @yaegashi Jul 21, 2015 at 15:13

2 Answers 2

4

Running rsync on every update is also wasteful. The following script runs rsync and curl once when there's no activity for 0.1 second since the last event.

#!/bin/bash
time_stamp=$(date +"%B-%d-%Y")
inotifywait -mr /usr/lib/unifi-video/data/videos -e create -e moved_to |
while true; do
  T=''
  while read $T path action file; do
    echo "The file '$file' appeared in directory '$path' via '$action'"
    T='-t 0.1'
  done
  rsync -avz -e "ssh -p 221" /usr/lib/unifi-video/data/videos/ [email protected]:~/"$time_stamp"/ 
  curl http://textbelt.com/text -d number=XXXXXXX -d "message=Motion Detected"
done
0
3

Have you looked at lsyncd? It's pretty much the same as what you have set up manually, except it runs as a proper service.

3
  • Oh yeah I forget about lsyncd which would be much easier and better solution, thanks for this post. Could you provide a config example to run a custom process (curl in OP) on each transfer with some updates aggregated?
    – yaegashi
    Jul 22, 2015 at 1:05
  • I'm not familiar enough with it to give an example. I just set it up, and let it do its job. You'd probably want to ask a separate question... or even better, ask on an lsync board somewhere. The other option might be to have a different process watch the lsyncd log file, and notify based on that. Jul 22, 2015 at 17:14
  • Actually... watching lsyncd's log file is probably the way to go... you'd just end up with the same problem if you tried to work a notification in to the lsyncd config. But if you had something that waited for changes on the lsyncd log file, and then waited until say, a minute since the last change to it, and then send out a curl notification, you'd probably end up with what you want. Jul 22, 2015 at 17:40

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