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I have a server with 8 network interfaces configured. From it, I share some directories and export nfs mounts to other servers.

My question is how do I figure out which of the 8 interfaces is used by NFS? I want to disable one of them and I wouldn't want anything to happen to the mounts.

I am using Solaris 10.

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  • can you see I/O counts for the interfaces and drive some big NFS traffic? – Skaperen Jul 6 '15 at 8:17
  • I was thinking of using snoop on each interface on ports 111 and 2049, however I am not sure how to generate significant traffic in order for it to show up on snoop. Also I don't think that I am allowed to unmount what is already mounted. – robertpas Jul 6 '15 at 8:35
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from NFS server, try

netstat -an | grep 2049

you should see something like

      *.2049               *.*                0      0 49152      0 LISTEN
10.12.13.97.2049      10.12.13.90.914       49640      0 49640      0 ESTABLISHED
  • first line saysthat nfsd (service number 2049) is listening on all interfaces *.2049 LISTEN
  • next line says there is a connection from distant host 10.12.13.90
  • so connection goes on 10.12.13.X network

you will connect with network using netstat -in

Name  Mtu  Net/Dest      Address        Ipkts  Ierrs Opkts  Oerrs Collis Queue
lo0   8232 127.0.0.0     127.0.0.1      711988047 0     711988047 0     0      0
aggr1 1500 10.12.13.0     10.12.13.97     102780417 0     171623103 0     0      0
aggr2 1500 10.22.33.0     10.22.33.97     2944376600 0     2272441510 0     0      0

hence nfs is using aggr1.

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  • What if from netstat -an I obtain only *.2049 Idle and *.2049 *.* 0 0 49152 0 LISTEN? – robertpas Jul 6 '15 at 8:47
  • @robertpas you have no actual connection – Archemar Jul 6 '15 at 8:57
  • NFS can also use UDP. But I don't have access to a running example of Solaris that uses serves NFS via UDP so I don't know how that would appear in netstat output, See stackoverflow.com/questions/584112/… for more data on NFS over UDP. – Andrew Henle Jul 6 '15 at 22:32

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