6

I am currently watching some process on my server and want to see how much bandwidth it has used in total since it has been started. I don't want to know its current usage, nor does nethogs / nload help me.

3

Funny question. It seems you can see snmp values of a process in /proc/[pid]/net/dev_snmp6/[DEV] at least for IP6:

ifIndex                             4
Ip6InReceives                       4
Ip6InHdrErrors                      0
Ip6InTooBigErrors                   0
Ip6InNoRoutes                       0
Ip6InAddrErrors                     0
Ip6InUnknownProtos                  0
Ip6InTruncatedPkts                  0
Ip6InDiscards                       0
Ip6InDelivers                       4
Ip6OutForwDatagrams                 0
Ip6OutRequests                      24
Ip6OutDiscards                      0
Ip6OutNoRoutes                      0
Ip6ReasmTimeout                     0
Ip6ReasmReqds                       0
Ip6ReasmOKs                         0
Ip6ReasmFails                       0
Ip6FragOKs                          0
Ip6FragFails                        0
Ip6FragCreates                      0
Ip6InMcastPkts                      2
Ip6OutMcastPkts                     34
Ip6InOctets                         618
Ip6OutOctets                        1946
Ip6InMcastOctets                    304
Ip6OutMcastOctets                   2786
Ip6InBcastOctets                    0
Ip6OutBcastOctets                   0
Ip6InNoECTPkts                      4
Ip6InECT1Pkts                       0
Ip6InECT0Pkts                       0
Ip6InCEPkts                         0
Icmp6InMsgs                         2
Icmp6InErrors                       0
Icmp6OutMsgs                        22
Icmp6OutErrors                      0
Icmp6InCsumErrors                   0
Icmp6InDestUnreachs                 0
Icmp6InPktTooBigs                   0
Icmp6InTimeExcds                    0
Icmp6InParmProblems                 0
Icmp6InEchos                        0
Icmp6InEchoReplies                  0
Icmp6InGroupMembQueries             0
Icmp6InGroupMembResponses           0
Icmp6InGroupMembReductions          0
Icmp6InRouterSolicits               0
Icmp6InRouterAdvertisements         2
Icmp6InNeighborSolicits             0
Icmp6InNeighborAdvertisements       0
Icmp6InRedirects                    0
Icmp6InMLDv2Reports                 0
Icmp6OutDestUnreachs                0
Icmp6OutPktTooBigs                  0
Icmp6OutTimeExcds                   0
Icmp6OutParmProblems                0
Icmp6OutEchos                       0
Icmp6OutEchoReplies                 0
Icmp6OutGroupMembQueries            0
Icmp6OutGroupMembResponses          0
Icmp6OutGroupMembReductions         0
Icmp6OutRouterSolicits              9
Icmp6OutRouterAdvertisements        0
Icmp6OutNeighborSolicits            3
Icmp6OutNeighborAdvertisements      0
Icmp6OutRedirects                   0
Icmp6OutMLDv2Reports                10
Icmp6InType134                      2
Icmp6OutType133                     9
Icmp6OutType135                     3
Icmp6OutType143                     10

but quite likely that is a special kernel feature I eventually compiled in.

  • Thanks for this answer. Unfortunately this is a little late now because we had to continue our work, killing the process. But I know this will be helpful some time. Seems to be quite tricky to do this though ;) Best advice would be to run some kind of network monitoring as a "default" on a Linux server right after installation. – Flatron Jun 22 '15 at 20:09
  • 1
    The network monitoring is no problem. But it's hard get the network io for a process. I was astonished to find something for ipv6. Your best bet is to setup a virtual network for a process and monitor the virtual interface. – ikrabbe Jun 22 '15 at 20:15
2

See my answer here.

You can use nethog with total bandwidth monitored per MB since it started with:

sudo nethogs -v 3

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