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This question already has an answer here:

I understand that if a persistent / disk-based volume is full, files need to be explicitly deleted to free up space before more can be added.

Further, I understand that if memory is exhausted, the Linux kernel's OOM-killer will begin terminating processes in order to free up memory.

As tmpfs is an in-memory file-system, it occurred to me that there may or may not be some cross-over between regular volume behaviour and Linux's memory management.

Does the OOM-killer automatically start removing files based on some criteria (either by default or with configuration)?

Or is tmpfs in all respects just like other file-systems when it is full (and swap is full)?

EDIT #1

I've read Out of Swap - What happens? but it doesn't even mention "tmpfs" which is what this question is about.

EDIT #2

I've read What sets the size of tmpfs? What happens when its full? and this answers the question well enough that I think my question is practically a duplicate.

marked as duplicate by Anthon, slm May 26 '15 at 4:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Thanks @Bichoy, but my question is specifically about tmpfs + OOM-killer. – jokeyrhyme May 26 '15 at 1:49
  • Good .. just checking :) I had a question about tmpfs earlier this week (what sets the size of tmps? what happens when its full?), and the answer I got is that it acts the same as any another application using the memory ... So out-of memory behavior should be similar, to the best of my understanding. – Bichoy May 26 '15 at 1:53
  • @Bichoy ah, okay. Your question actually does answer my question. OOM killer is not involved at all. unix.stackexchange.com/questions/205174/… – jokeyrhyme May 26 '15 at 1:56
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No, the OOM-killer is not involved at all. There is no magic. tmpfs just behaves like any other file-system: What sets the size of tmpfs? What happens when its full?

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