7

I put the following script in /etc/init.d/rc3.d on my Debian 7 but it doesn't work on my computer

   #! /bin/sh
    # . /etc/rc.d/init.d/functions  # uncomment/modify for your killproc
    case "$1" in
        start)
            echo "Starting noip2."
            /usr/local/bin/noip2
        ;;
        stop)
            echo -n "Shutting down noip2."
            killproc -TERM /usr/local/bin/noip2
        ;;
        *)
            echo "Usage: $0 {start|stop}"
            exit 1
    esac
    exit 0

How can I automatically run noip2 daemon when the machine is booted?


Here is the full documetation from the noip2 source folder:

            This file describes noip2, a second-generation Linux client for the 
            no-ip.com dynamic DNS service.

 NEW:   This code will build and run on Solaris/Intel and BSD also.
    Edit the Makefile for Solaris and the various BSDs.
    For BSD users wanting to use a tun interface, see below.
    Let me know about any other changes needed for noip2 to 
   operate correctly on your non-Linux OS.
    Mac OS X is a BSD variant. 

    Please read this short file before using noip2. 

    ###########################################################################
     HOW TO BUILD AN EXECUTABLE FOR YOUR SYSTEM

     The command 
      make 
     will build a binary of the noip2 client that will run on your system.

     If you do not have 'make' installed and you have an i686 Linux machine 
     with libc6, a binary for i686 systems is located in the binaries 
     directory called noip2-Linux. Copy that binary to the build directory 
     'cp binaries/noip2-Linux noip2'

     The command
     make install
     (which must be run as root) will install the various pieces to their appropriate places.  This will ask questions and build a                       configuration 
                  data file.  
                  See below if you can't become root or can't write in /usr/local/*.

###########################################################################
              HOW TO USE THE CLIENT WITHOUT READING THE REST OF THIS TEXT

       Usual operation?
       /usr/local/bin/noip2 -C          configure a client
       /usr/local/bin/noip2         run a client
       /usr/local/bin/noip2 -S          display info about running clients
       /usr/local/bin/noip2 -D pid      toggle the debug state for client pid
       /usr/local/bin/noip2 -K pid      terminate client pid

       Have more than one internet access device? 
       /usr/local/bin/noip2 -M -c file      start additional instances

       ###########################################################################
       HOW TO START THE CLIENT

       The noip2 executable can be run by typing /usr/local/bin/noip2

       If you want it to run automatically when the machine is booted, then
       place the following script in your startup directory. (/etc/init.d/rcX.d
       or /sbin/init.d/rcX.d or ???) 

        #######################################################
        #! /bin/sh
        # . /etc/rc.d/init.d/functions  # uncomment/modify for your killproc
        case "$1" in
            start)
            echo "Starting noip2."
            /usr/local/bin/noip2
            ;;
            stop)
            echo -n "Shutting down noip2."
            killproc -TERM /usr/local/bin/noip2
            ;;
            *)
            echo "Usage: $0 {start|stop}"
            exit 1
        esac
        exit 0
        #######################################################

          Where the 'X' in rcX.d is the value obtained by running the 
       following command
        grep initdefault /etc/inittab | awk -F: '{print $2}'

       Killproc can be downloaded from ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/projects/init
       Alternatively, you can uncomment the line after #! /bin/sh

       If you have a recent RedHat version, you may want to use the startup script
       supplied by another user.  It's in this package called redhat.noip.sh
       It may need some modification for your system.

       There is a startup script for Debian called debian.noip2.sh.
       It also has been supplied by another user and is rumored to fail  in some situations.

       Another user has supplied a proceedure to follow for MAc OS X auto startup.
       It's called mac.osx.startup.  Mac users may wish to read that file.

       Here is a script which will kill all running copies of noip2.
         #!/bin/sh
         for i in `noip2 -S 2>&1 | grep Process | awk '{print $2}' | tr -d ','`
         do
           noip2 -K $i
         done
       These four lines can replace 'killproc' and 'stop_daemon' in the other scripts.

       If you are behind a firewall, you will need to allow port 8245 (TCP) through in both directions.
       #######################################################################

       IMPORTANT!!  Please set the permissions correctly on your executable.
       If you start noip2 using one of the above methods, do the following:
       chmod 700 /usr/local/bin/noip2
       chown root:root /usr/local/bin/noip2
       If you start noip2 manually from a non-root account, do the chmod 700 as 
       above but chown the executable to the owner:group of the            non-root account, and
       you will need to substitute your new path if the executable is not in 
        /usr/local/bin.

       ###########################################################################
       SAVED STATE

       Noip2 will save the last IP address that was set at no-ip.com when it ends.  
       This setting will be read back in the next time noip2 is started. The
       configuration data file must be writable for this to happen!  Nothing
       happens if it isn't, the starting 0.0.0.0 address is left unchanged.
       If noip2 is started as root it will change to user 'nobody', group 
       'nobody'.  Therefore the file must be writeable by user 'nobody' or
       group 'nobody' in this case!

       ###########################################################################
       BSD USING A TUN DEVICE

       Recent BSD systems will use getifaddrs() to list ALL interfaces.  Set the 
       'bsd_wth_getifaddrs' define in the Makefile if using a version of BSD 
       which supports getifaddrs() and ignore the rest of this paragraph. 
       Mac OS X users should have a versdion of BSD which supports getifaddrs().
       Otherwise set the 'bsd' define.
       The 'bsd' setting will not list the tun devices in BSD.  Therefore a tun 
       device cannot be selected from the menu.  If you want to use a tun device
       you will need to edit the Makefile and change the line
            ${BINDIR}/${TGT} -C -Y -c /tmp/no-ip2.conf
            to
            ${BINDIR}/${TGT} -C -Y -c /tmp/no-ip2.conf -I 'your tun device'


       COMMAND LINE ARGUMENTS WHEN INVOKING THE CLIENT

       The client will put itself in the background and run as a daemon.  This 
       means if you invoke it multiple times, and supply the multiple-use flag, 
       you will have multiple instances running. 

       If you want the client to run once and exit, supply the '-i IPaddress' 
       argument.  The client will behave well if left active all the time even on 
       intermittent dialup connections; it uses very few resources.

       The actions of the client are controlled by a configuration data file.  It is usually located in /usr/local/etc/no-ip2.conf, but may be placed anywhere if 
       the '-c new_location' parameter is passed on the startup line.

       The configuration data file can be generated with the '-C'     parameter. 

       There are some new command line arguments dealing with default values in the configuration data file.  They are  -F, -Y and -U.

       The interval between successive testing for a changed IP address is controlled 
       the '-U nn' parameter.  The number is minutes, a minimum of 1 is enforced
       by the client when running on the firewall machine, 5 when running behind 
       a router/firewall.  A usual value for clients behind a firewall is 30.
       One day is 1440, one week is 10080, one month is 40320, 41760, 43200 or 44640.
       One hour is left as an exercise for the reader :-)

       The configuration builder code will allow selection among the hosts/groups
       registered at no-ip.com for the selected user.  The '-Y' parameter will
       cause all the hosts/groups to be selected for update.

       Some sites have multiple connections to the internet.  These sites confuse 
       the auto NAT detection.  The '-F' parameter will force the non-NAT
       or "firewall" setting.

       The client can be invoked with the '-i IPaddress' parameter which will force
       the setting of that address at no-ip.com.  The client will run once and exit.

       The -I parameter can be used to override the device name in the configuration
       data file or to force the supplied name into the configuration data file while
       it is being created.  Please use this as a last resort!

       The '-S' parameter is used to display the data associated with any running 
       copies of noip2.  If nothing is running, it will display the 
       contents of the configuration data file that is selected. It will then exit.

       The '-K process_ID' parameter is used to terminate a running copy of noip2.
       The process_ID value can be obtained by running noip2 -S.

       The '-M' parameter will permit multiple running copies of the noip2 client. 
       Each must have it's own configuration file.  Up to 4 copies may run simultaneously.

       All errors and informational messages are stored via the syslog facility.
       A line indicating a successful address change at no-ip.com is always written to the syslog. The syslog is usually /var/log/messages.

       If the client has been built with debugging enabled, the usual state, the '-d'
       parameter will activate the debug output.  This will produce a trace of the 
       running program and should help if you are having problems getting the 
       connection to no-ip.com established.  All errors, messages and I/O in both 
       directions will be displayed on the stderr instead of syslog.
       The additional '-D pid' parameter will toggle the debug state of a running 
       noip2 process.  This will not change where the output of the process is 
       appearing; if it was going to the syslog, it will still be going to the syslog.

       One final invocation parameter is '-h'.  This displays the help screen as shown below and ends.                      

       USAGE: noip2 [ -C [ -F][ -Y][ -U #min]][ -c file]
    [ -d][ -D pid][ -i addr][ -S][ -M][ -h]

       Version Linux-2.x.x
       Options: -C               create configuration data
                -F               force NAT off
                -Y               select all hosts/groups
                -U minutes       set update interval
                -c config_file   use alternate data path
                -d               increase debug verbosity
                -D processID     toggle debug flag for PID
                -i IPaddress     use supplied address
                -I interface     use supplied interface
                -S               show configuration data
                -M               permit multiple instances
                -K processID     terminate instance PID
                -h               help (this text)

       ###########################################################################
       HOW TO CONFIGURE THE CLIENT

       The command
        noip2 -C
       will create configuration data in the /usr/local/etc directory.
       It will be stored in a file called no-ip2.conf.

       If you can't write in /usr/local/*, or are unable to become root on 
       the machine on which you wish to run noip2, you will need to include 
       the '-c config_file_name' on every invocation of the client, including 
       the creation of the datafile.  Also, you will probably need to put the 
       executable somewhere you can write to.  Change the PREFIX= line in the 
       Makefile to your new path and re-run make install to avoid these problems.

       You will need to re-create the datafile whenever your account or password
       changes or when you add or delete hosts and/or groups at www.no-ip.com
       Each invocation of noip2 with '-C' will destroy the previous datafile.

       Other options that can be used here include '-F' '-Y' -U'

       You will be asked if you want to run a program/script upon successful update 
       at no-ip.com.  If you specify a script, it should start with #!/bin/sh or 
       your shell of choice.  If it doesn't, you will get the 'Exec format error'
       error.  The IP address that has just been set successfully will            be delivered 
       as the first argument to the script/program.  The host/group            name will be delivered as the second argument.

       Some machines have multiple network connections.  In this case, you will be prompted to select the device which connects to outside world. The -I flag can be supplied to select an interface which is not shown.  Typically, this would be one of the pppx interfaces which do not exist until they are active.

       The code will prompt for the username/email used as an account identifier at no-ip.com.  It will also prompt for the password for that account.

       The configuration data contains no user-serviceable parts!!

       IMPORTANT!!  Please set the permissions correctly on the configuration data.
          chmod 600 /usr/local/etc/no-ip2.conf.
          chown root:root /usr/local/etc/no-ip2.conf.
          If you start noip2 manually from a non-root account, do the chmod as above but chown the no-ip2.conf file to the owner:group of the non-root  account.  Make sure the directory is readable!

          The program will drop root privileges after acquiring the configuration data file.

And the sample init script for debian:

        #! /bin/sh
        # /etc/init.d/noip2.sh

        # Supplied by no-ip.com
        # Modified for Debian GNU/Linux by Eivind L. Rygge <eivind@rygge.org>
        # corrected 1-17-2004 by Alex Docauer <alex@docauer.net>

        # . /etc/rc.d/init.d/functions  # uncomment/modify for your killproc

        DAEMON=/usr/local/bin/noip2
        NAME=noip2

        test -x $DAEMON || exit 0

        case "$1" in
        start)
        echo -n "Starting dynamic address update: "
        start-stop-daemon --start --exec $DAEMON
        echo "noip2."
        ;;
        stop)
        echo -n "Shutting down dynamic address update:"
        start-stop-daemon --stop --oknodo --retry 30 --exec $DAEMON
        echo "noip2."
        ;;

        restart)
        echo -n "Restarting dynamic address update: "
        start-stop-daemon --stop --oknodo --retry 30 --exec $DAEMON
        start-stop-daemon --start --exec $DAEMON
        echo "noip2."
        ;;

        *)
        echo "Usage: $0 {start|stop|restart|force-reload}"
        exit 1
        esac
        exit 0
  • Does your script have the executable flag set? Does it work if you run /etc/init.d/rc3.d/service stop or /etc/init.d/rc3.d/service start? Also, shouldn't it be located in /etc/rc3.d? – vtorhonen Apr 28 '15 at 16:20
  • yes, it should but did't run automatically. – Vitor Mazuco Apr 28 '15 at 17:36
  • Where is your LSB header? – PersianGulf Apr 28 '15 at 20:10
  • LSB header? So sorry, whats is it? – Vitor Mazuco Apr 29 '15 at 0:05
  • @MohsenPahlevanzadeh please see the full documentation. – Vitor Mazuco Apr 29 '15 at 14:00
16

Two steps for you to solve this. Your script (/etc/init.d/noip2) should look like:

#! /bin/sh
# /etc/init.d/noip2

# Supplied by no-ip.com
# Modified for Debian GNU/Linux by Eivind L. Rygge <eivind@rygge.org>
# Updated by David Courtney to not use pidfile 130130 for Debian 6.
# Updated again by David Courtney to "LSBize" the script for Debian 7.

### BEGIN INIT INFO
# Provides:     noip2
# Required-Start: networking
# Required-Stop:
# Should-Start:
# Should-Stop:
# Default-Start: 2 3 4 5
# Default-Stop: 0 1 6
# Short-Description: Start noip2 at boot time
# Description: Start noip2 at boot time
### END INIT INFO

# . /etc/rc.d/init.d/functions  # uncomment/modify for your killproc

DAEMON=/usr/local/bin/noip2
NAME=noip2

test -x $DAEMON || exit 0

case "$1" in
    start)
    echo -n "Starting dynamic address update: "
    start-stop-daemon --start --exec $DAEMON
    echo "noip2."
    ;;
    stop)
    echo -n "Shutting down dynamic address update:"
    start-stop-daemon --stop --oknodo --retry 30 --exec $DAEMON
    echo "noip2."
    ;;

    restart)
    echo -n "Restarting dynamic address update: "
    start-stop-daemon --stop --oknodo --retry 30 --exec $DAEMON
    start-stop-daemon --start --exec $DAEMON
    echo "noip2."
    ;;

    *)
    echo "Usage: $0 {start|stop|restart}"
    exit 1
esac
exit 0

Then make it executable, i.e run

# chmod a+x /etc/init.d/noip2
# update-rc.d noip2 defaults
  • This worked for me on Ubuntu Server 16.04. Thanks! – JohnnyCoder Oct 17 '17 at 15:04
  • why is it so hard to set up a crontab for noip command ? sudo noip2 -u usrname -p paswrd -i upnpc -l | grep ExternalIPAddress | awk '{print $3}'`` – Ciasto piekarz Nov 12 '17 at 13:00
  • Why is it so hard to understand that not everyone is as smart, talented, and handsome as you? – Russell Aug 13 '18 at 2:12
0

Here is a more straightforward way to approach this...

We are trying to mimic your regular user account issuing this command (assuming you followed No-IP's recommended setup instructions) ...

sudo noip2

The reason your regular user account (instead of your super user) needs to issue this command is because your regular user account has some No-IP-specific stuff that needs to be accessed when issuing this command. So to mimic issuing the command above as your regular user account with elevated privileges at startup, do the following...

Edit your super user's crontab by issuing this command...

sudo crontab -e    (choose your favorite text editor if prompted)

Add this line at the bottom of the file...

@reboot su -l <regular account username> && sudo noip2

Save the file and reboot your system. You will find that noip2 has been started properly.

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