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I recently tried to install Debian alongside the mint installation I am using to type this. However, I keep getting this strange error whenever I try to boot it, even after a fresh install (partitioning seems fine) - I keep getting this bizzare error. In fact my screen looks like this:

[1.77***] AMD-Vi: Event Logged [IO_PAGE_FAULT] device= 02.00 address= [same address every time] flags=0x0010

I have seven partitions, and the UEFI is not the first partition... it goes something like: Mint, Debian, Swap, tiny free space, UEFI, swap.

(Yes, I know, two swaps.)

All the way down the screen. Recovery mode doesn't boot up either. In the past, the install would warn me that I needed firmware to run the system. Now, when I try to install it, it does not seem to warn me of this..

Is anyone so kind as to tell me what's going on here? Other than this, I really don't have a clue!

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This appears to be a known bug in the installer. The short answer is that you need to add iommu=soft to the command line right before booting. In fact, if you edit the parameters in grub directly, put this right before where it says quiet.

In order to fix it up from a live CD, you can follow this procedure:

blkid

This may help you figure out which filesystem you want to mount if you don't already know. This file system, will be, of course, your non-booting Debian.

Replace /dev/sda3 with your location, then run these commands in a working terminal (another Linux system, of course):

sudo mount /dev/sda3 /mnt
sudo mount --bind /dev/ /mnt/dev
sudo mount --bind /proc /mnt/proc
sudo mount --bind /sys /mnt/sys
sudo chroot /mnt

Then you can edit your grub. Edit the file: /etc/default/grub. Goto the line where it says

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="" and and change it to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="iommu=soft".

Be sure to update-grub. And of course, mkdir /mnt if you have no /mnt, although it can be any folder - nothing is special about the folder being named /mnt.

Also, this could conceivably hose up your grub. In order to simply boot right back in, use the Super Grub2 disk, found at http://www.supergrubdisk.org/. This will list all your OS's on it's own with reasonable defaults and recover you old boot options as well.

Bewarned, if you have fancy hardware this may not be your only problem - for example an error with noveau might mean you need to install graphics card drivers.

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