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Oracle Linux 5.10

I can manually run the script "tblspc_usage.sh" successfully as the oracle user. I know this because it emails me a report.

But it not run at all from cron. It doesn't generate a log file.

[oracle@dub-ImrORA3 scripts]$ crontab -l
# user /bin/sh
SHELL=/bin/sh
# mail to oracle user
MAILTO=oracle
# run at 9:45 AM monday thur friday
45 09 * * 1-5 /home/oracle/scripts/tblspc_usage.sh 2>&1 /home/oracle/scripts/tblspc_usage.log

[oracle@dub-ImrORA3 scripts]$ ls -al tblspc_usage.sh
-rwxrwxr-- 1 oracle oinstall 2013 Jan 20 09:12 tblspc_usage.sh

Okay, here is the email in /var/mail/oracle /home/oracle/scripts/tblspc_usage.sh: line 15: sqlplus: command not found grep: body.log: No such file or directory

Here is my shell script:

#!/bin/sh
#
# tblspc_usage.sh
#=======================================
#
# Checks for tablespace usage exceeding 90% and email the details
# does not check undo or temp tablespaces
#=======================================
#
ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/db_1 ; export ORACLE_HOME
ORACLE_SID=IMR1 ; export ORACLE_SID
user="system"
pass="letmein" # bogus passwd

sqlplus -S $user/$pass <<EOF
   column "TOTAL ALLOC (MB)"      format 9,999,990.00
   column "TOTAL PHYS ALLOC (MB)" format 9,999,990.00
   column "USED (MB)"             format 9,999,990.00
   column "FREE (MB)"             format 9,999,990.00
   column "% USED"                format 990.00
   set echo off
   spool body.log
   select 
       a.tablespace_name,
       a.bytes_alloc/(1024*1024)               "TOTAL ALLOC (MB)",
       a.physical_bytes/(1024*1024)            "TOTAL PHYS ALLOC (MB)",
       nvl(b.tot_used,0)/(1024*1024)           "USED (MB)",
       (nvl(b.tot_used,0)/a.bytes_alloc)*100   "USED %"
   from 
       (select 
            tablespace_name,
            sum(bytes) physical_bytes,
            sum(decode(autoextensible,'NO',bytes,'YES',maxbytes)) bytes_alloc
        from 
            dba_data_files
        group by 
            tablespace_name ) a,
   (select 
        tablespace_name, 
        sum(bytes) tot_used
    from 
        dba_segments
    group by 
        tablespace_name ) b
  where 
        a.tablespace_name = b.tablespace_name (+)
  and 
        a.tablespace_name not in 
           (select distinct 
                   tablespace_name 
            from 
                   dba_temp_files
           )
  and      
        a.tablespace_name not like 'UNDO%'
  and
       ( nvl(b.tot_used,0)/a.bytes_alloc)*100 >= 90.00
  order by 1;

    spool off
    exit
EOF

   # if the word "TABLESPACE" exists in the spool file 
   # then at least one tablespace has usage over 90%
   if grep -q TABLESPACE "body.log";
   then
        cat /home/oracle/scripts/body.log | mailx -s "ORA3 - Tablespace(s) 90% Full" \
        [email protected]
   fi
2
  • I know this might be a stupid question but is crond started ? you can check by using service crond status.
    – Digisec
    Commented Jan 20, 2015 at 18:30
  • Yes, crond is running: [root@dub-ImrORA3 ~]# service crond status crond (pid 3933) is running...
    – Stringer
    Commented Jan 20, 2015 at 18:33

2 Answers 2

1

The message sqlplus: command not found gives the answer. Since you have an environment variable ORACLE_HOME set, put this line in your script after exporting ORACLE_HOME:

export PATH=$PATH:$ORACLE_HOME/bin

I also have a superstition of exporting TNS_ADMIN:

export TNS_ADMIN=$ORACLE_HOME/network/admin

I don't know if that's strictly necessary.

1
  • adding the EXPORT statement worked. I also had to specify the full path to the Oracle spool file. Thanks!
    – Stringer
    Commented Jan 20, 2015 at 18:57
1

Seems like you updated your post with more information, like Bruce said, that error tells you that ORACLE_HOME path is missing. Update your script to include:

export ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/db_1
export PATH=$PATH:$ORACLE_HOME/bin
export ORACLE_SID=IMR1

I would still fix this in your cron:

# run at 9:45 AM monday thur friday
45 09 * * 1-5 /home/oracle/scripts/tblspc_usage.sh >> /home/oracle/scripts/tblspc_usage.log 2>&1
  • Append to log: >>
  • Redirect stderr to log file (in this case same as stdout): 2>&1
1
  • Correct - log file was not being created until I made your suggested change.
    – Stringer
    Commented Jan 20, 2015 at 19:09

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