3

Example: I type man ls, than I want to get man only.

By using !! I can get man ls but how do I get man?

  • Hi, you can try to use fc command , fc -rl | awk '{ print $2 }' | head -1 – Edouard Fazenda Jan 19 '15 at 10:44
  • !:0 will give you word 0 (the command word itself) of the previous command. – PM 2Ring Jan 19 '15 at 10:46
  • And if you want to see the command produced by history expansion before hitting Enter you can use the shell-expand-line key sequence M-C-e, that is Meta-Ctrl-e; Meta is usually Alt. – PM 2Ring Jan 19 '15 at 10:51
7

You can select particular word from last typed command with !!: and a word designator. As a word designator you need 0. You may find ^ and $ useful too. From man bash:

Word Designators

0 (zero) The zeroth word. For the shell, this is the command word.

^ The first argument. That is, word 1.

$ The last argument.

So in your case try:

echo !!:0
  • Second comment under my question mentions: !:0, what is the difference between !:0 and !!:0? – syntagma Jan 19 '15 at 10:47
  • You can use !:0, and note in bash, if extglob is enabled, it must not follow by blank, newline, \r, = or (. – cuonglm Jan 19 '15 at 10:48
  • 1
    @REACHUS ! starts history substitution and !! refer to previous command. Probably single ! in some cases denotes !! and indeed echo !:0 works but echo ! doesn't while !! works in both cases. – jimmij Jan 19 '15 at 10:52
  • 1
    You don't need to echo. You can use the p modifier instead: !!:0:p – muru Jan 19 '15 at 10:55
4

In interactive mode, the easiest way to do this is just a keystroke combination alt+0 and alt+.. The shortcut alt+. means "recall n-th word from the previous line" (by default the last one) and alt+0 gives it an argument 0.

This should work for interactive bash on most systems (more generally, all shells that use readline as its input library).

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/4009412/bash-how-to-use-arguments-from-previous-command

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