22

Is xorg.conf.d no longer used by Arch Linux? If so, does anyone know where the configuration files that once lived under said directory now reside?

2 Answers 2

24

The default X config files live in /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d in arch. You can still put them in /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d if you want.

3
  • This is the same under Debian Stretch.
    – 71GA
    Dec 3, 2017 at 6:22
  • 2
    Same also for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Xenial Xerus. Dec 27, 2017 at 18:05
  • 5
    It's not "if you want", the file in share can be overwritten by the system, while the /etc one will stay. Copy a version of share to etc if you want to modify it.
    – Déjà vu
    Aug 22, 2018 at 5:04
12

It seems that Arch Linux no longer places the default config files in /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d, it now leaves that wholly to system-specific (user-made) config files.

Note: Arch supplies default configuration files in /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d, and no extra configuration is necessary for most setups.

Xorg uses a configuration file called xorg.conf and files ending in the suffix .conf for its initial setup: the complete list of the folders where these files are searched can be found at [1] or by running man xorg.conf, together with a detailed explanation of all the available options. Using .conf files The /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/ directory stores host-specific configuration. You are free to add configuration files there, but they must have a .conf suffix: the files are read in ASCII order, and by convention their names start with XX- (two digits and a hyphen, so that for example 10 is read before 20). These files are parsed by the X server upon startup and are treated like part of the traditional xorg.conf configuration file. The X server essentially treats the collection of configuration files as one big file with entries from xorg.conf at the end. Using xorg.conf Xorg can also be configured via /etc/X11/xorg.conf or /etc/xorg.conf. You can also generate a skeleton for xorg.conf with:

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .