18

Shouldn't it be possible? Let's assume I don't need a response, I just want to send a request. Shouldn't we be able to alter tcp/ip headers, because our computer sends it? I am probably missing something, just really curious, learning about it in the uni.

22

You can using the -H/--header argument:

You could spoof your ip address:

curl --header "X-Forwarded-For: 192.168.0.2" http://example.com

Example:
client

$ curl http://webhost.co.uk  

web host

$ tailf access.log | grep 192.168.0.54   
192.168.0.54 - - [10/Nov/2014:15:56:09 +0000] "GET / HTTP/1.1" 200 14328 "-"   
"curl/7.19.7 (x86_64-redhat-linux-gnu) libcurl/7.19.7 NSS/3.14.0.0 zlib/1.2.3   
libidn/1.18 libssh2/1.4.2"

client with ip address changed

$ curl --header "X-Forwarded-For: 192.168.0.99" http://webhost.co.uk   

web host

$ tailf access.log | grep 192.168.0.99  
192.168.0.99 - - [10/Nov/2014:15:56:43 +0000] "GET / HTTP/1.1" 200  
14328 "-" "curl/7.19.7 (x86_64-redhat-linux-gnu) libcurl/7.19.7 NSS/3.14.0.0  
zlib/1.2.3 libidn/1.18 libssh2/1.4.2"  

man curl

 -H/--header <header>
              (HTTP)  Extra header to use when getting a web page. You may
              specify any number of extra headers. Note that if you should add
              a custom header that has the same name as one of the internal
              ones curl would use, your externally set header  will  be  used
              instead  of the internal one. This allows you to make even
              trickier stuff than curl would normally do. You should not
              replace internally set headers without knowing perfectly well
              what you’re doing. Remove an internal header by  giving  a
              replacement without content on the right side of the colon,
              as in: -H "Host:".

References:

Modify_method_and_headers

  • 1
    I want to change source IP I think, and it doesn't allow that as far as I can tell... – tmm Nov 10 '14 at 15:33
  • To which protocol? I have added a real world example of the source IP address change being reflected in the apache access logs. – geedoubleya Nov 10 '14 at 16:15
  • 2
    http http http http – tmm Nov 10 '14 at 16:30
  • This won't change the IP the machine sees attached to the raw TCP request. – de Raad Feb 16 '17 at 9:37
3

I think the accepted answer will not really help you spoof your IP all the way. You can't really spoof your source IP unless you have access to routers close to the target machine.

TCP works on a 3-way handshake mechanism. You'll not be able to complete this handshake as the handshake response from the target machine will go to your spoofed IP and not your own (unless, as said before, you control his nearby routers and redirect the response towards yourself).

P.S.: You might be able to send a UDP message, but I haven't tried it.

  • Since the original question asked about how this would be done with curl, I'm assuming they are trying to access some HTTP resource. HTTP over UDP is not something that curl supports AFAIK nor is it something beyond experimental at this point. – IvanGoneKrazy Feb 10 '17 at 8:19
0

It is possible to change the source IP address, if your local network interface has multiple IP addresses.

Suppose you have a server which has 2 IP addresses, 1.1.1.10 and 2.2.2.20:

$ ip route
default via 1.1.1.193 dev eth0 
1.1.1.192/27 via 1.1.1.193 dev eth0 
1.1.1.192/27 dev eth0  proto kernel  scope link  src 1.1.1.10
2.2.2.20 via 2.2.2.20 dev eth0  scope link

You can verify your current public IP address with the awesome ifconfig.co web service:

$ curl -4 ifconfig.co
1.1.1.10

To access the ifconfig.co web service using the other IP address (2.2.2.20), you can create a route based on the target server's IP address. Use dig to find the target IP addresses from the DNS A records:

$ dig ifconfig.co
...
ifconfig.co.            39      IN      A       104.28.18.94
ifconfig.co.            39      IN      A       104.28.19.94
...

Now add custom routes for these IP addresses:

$ ip route add 104.28.18.94/32 via 1.1.1.193 dev eth0 src 2.2.2.20
$ ip route add 104.28.19.94/32 via 1.1.1.193 dev eth0 src 2.2.2.20

Running curl again, you see that you are using the other source IP address:

$ curl -4 ifconfig.co
2.2.2.20

Also, your routing information is updated:

$ ip route
default via 1.1.1.193 dev eth0 
1.1.1.192/27 via 1.1.1.193 dev eth0 
1.1.1.192/27 dev eth0  proto kernel  scope link  src 1.1.1.10
2.2.2.20 via 2.2.2.20 dev eth0  scope link
104.28.18.94 via 1.1.1.193 dev eth0  src 2.2.2.20
104.28.19.94 via 1.1.1.193 dev eth0  src 2.2.2.20

Note: this only works if the source IP address can be resolved to your server, otherwise the TCP 3-way handshake will fail, as pointed out here.

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