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A few days ago I compiled GTK+ 3.12 on my Ubuntu 14.04 and Linux Mint 17 (with Cinnamon) distros. It messed up the appearance. How can I remove it totally and safely? I didn't change the default installation location when compiling.

I also have versions 3.10 and 2.24 (installed by default.)

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    Have a look at this: unix.stackexchange.com/questions/139181/…
    – goldilocks
    Oct 21, 2014 at 11:54
  • @goldilocks I got this error: make: *** No rule to make target 'uninstall'. Stop.
    – Javad
    Oct 21, 2014 at 12:03
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    If you are using a fresh extraction of the tarball you will have to run ./configure again first. This is the case if running just plain make returns make: *** No targets specified and no makefile found. Stop.
    – goldilocks
    Oct 21, 2014 at 12:22
  • How did you installed it?
    – Braiam
    Oct 21, 2014 at 12:31
  • @goldilocks Thank you! I already tried both ./configure and make and then tried make uninstall and that worked. I also think that installing the program using checkinstall and then uninstalling it using synaptic or apt-get or any package manager would be suitable, right?
    – Javad
    Oct 21, 2014 at 12:59

1 Answer 1

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Source packages which use autotools -- ./configure; make; make install -- usually have a make uninstall target as well. However, that target doesn't exist until you run ./configure (because there's actually no makefile), so if you get the error:

make: *** No rule to make target 'uninstall'. Stop.

That is likely the problem. This can be confirmed by trying just make; if you get make: *** No targets specified and no makefile found. Stop. then there is no makefile because ./configure has not been successfully run.

If you are using a fresh extraction of the source package to do the uninstall, it probably is not incredibly important if your options to ./configure are not exactly the same as the original build (with the exception of the target directories, which obviously must be the same) but it would be good to try and get close if you can remember them.

I also think that installing the program using checkinstall and then uninstalling it using synaptic or apt-get or any package manager would be suitable, right?

I haven't used checkinstall myself, but it certainly looks like a good idea and does appear to be explicitly useful in uninstalling things if you have used it in the first place. As far as I can tell it is only current for debian derived distros (such as ubuntu).

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