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I am executing some benchmark using a DBMS and virtual machines. And I am using this command

free && sync && echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches && free

on each Guest, and on each Host, before executing a query, to minimize the effect of cache/buffering on my execution time. If the data is cached/buffered the execution time for a query may vary depending on what query was executed before, because a part of the file used to answer the query might be in memory.

I saw this post: How do you empty the buffers and cache on a Linux system?

But for me it's a little tricky to execute sync/drop caches after each query. I need to ask for every VM and for every physical server to sync/drop caches. I could write a script, and use SSH to do this, but I wonder if there's a way to keep the OS from buffering/caching the files because it would be easier for me.

I am using Ubuntu 12.04 on all the VMs (using KVM) and servers.

  • It doesn't really make sense to completely disable caching. This would mean that every instruction that executes in a program would have to be fetched from disk, instead of loading the program into memory in whole blocks. – Barmar Oct 15 '14 at 18:15
  • Is there a way to avoid caching for files used by a specific process? All I want is to garantee that the queries will cause the data to be fetched from the disk, and not from memory. – hlustosa Oct 15 '14 at 18:24
  • So if the program reads from the file a byte at a time, each read should go to disk instead of using the block that was read for the previous read? I suspect that's not what you want, either. You just want the cache to be flushed before the program starts. – Barmar Oct 15 '14 at 18:26
  • Note that anything you do regarding the VM's cache probably won't affect the host's cache. – Barmar Oct 15 '14 at 18:27
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    If sync fixes the problem, then they aren't due to caching, but to buffering. – Gilles Oct 15 '14 at 23:16
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Use something like https://code.google.com/p/linux-ftools/ to mark all the files used by the database system as FADV_DONTNEED?

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