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I installed arch linux and figured I might want to have another distro or 5, so I left over half my hard drive space unallocated. Due to the fact that I wouldn't know how to add another distro to my bootloader(gummiboot) if I wanted to and that I am fine with only having arch, I would like to use the remaining space for my home partition. I didn't make it an LVM partition so I don't think it would be as easy as booting from a LiveCD and resizing.

Would backing up my home folder contents, deleting the home partition, creating a larger one and restoring the files provide the result that I want? If not, what would be the best way of doing this?

Here is the output of the lsblk command on my system:

[$user@arch ~]$ lsblk
NAME   MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda      8:0    0 298.1G  0 disk 
├─sda1   8:1    0   512M  0 part 
├─sda2   8:2    0    15G  0 part /
└─sda3   8:3    0   120G  0 part /home

And then there's 160GB of free space.

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You don't even need to do that.

Simply log out of all users and log back in as root (root's home is /root; not within /home)

Unmount the /home partition.

Resize /dev/sda3 using gparted or similar.

Mount /home.

Run lsblk - /dev/sda3 should now be about 280GiB.

  • Thanks, this worked perfectly. I didn't think it would be this easy. – HZrta7 Sep 11 '14 at 6:00
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Yes, backing up, deleting, creating a larger one and restoring is an easy way to do this.

Alternative to booting from LiveCD is to login as root and do this from the running system. However do not use su/sudo to change from an account that has it's home directory on the partition that is going to be backed-up and restored.

If you don't want to use a LiveCD, but want to login into a normal account and then use sudo, e.g. if you cannot login as root in a desktop, you can (temporarily) create an account with a home-directory that is not under /home.

  • Thank you, I wasn't aware I could even resize the partition at all. – HZrta7 Sep 11 '14 at 6:01

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