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Today I noticed that I lost approximately 1 TB of very old movies in my collection. I have no idea how it happened, but Munin shows what happened. I'm pretty sure it was my fault. (I was awake at that hour, yes; but, I am not 100% sure.) How can I prevent something like that from happening again? How can I prevent myself (or a program/script) from deleting more than x GB of data? Any suggestion is welcome. Munin - Disk usage

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As someone who has successfully removed the /Windows subdirectory from a running windows system, AND deleted the contents of /bin on a running linux boxen (it didn't die!)... I know the feeling. (But I don't know HOW I did the Windows thing, shouldn't be possible, Windows locks files in use.)

Several options:

  • chattr and the immutable flag as of now seems to be the best idea, I could apply it to every file that matches a certain mask. Mounting as read only isn't the best solution because every time I want to move a file to the mounted drive would be a pain. BTW, one year ago circa I made a batch script that renamed every single file in c:\windows\system32\ to *.torrent. Don't ask me how I did that. I still can't figure it out. Of course that wasn't my intent! – giovi321 Jun 21 '14 at 12:36
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I feel like the best option here might be to rename rm (or whatever you tend to use to delete stuff) and wrap that in a new rm script. By best option I don't mean best option, but its fun to think about doing this. You might just want to be more careful with your deletes.

I tested it out quickly after renaming rm to rm-real

#!/bin/bash
/bin/rm $1

And that works. You can have that make use of a few functions in rm and echo yourself a little note to use rm-real for full functionality, or go through the exercise of getting the arguments right.

Edit: Actually the best option is good backups. Changing rm is fun, but as noted in the comments a bit wonky.

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    Watering down the commands will bite you when you sit in front of a non-neutered Linux system. Learn not to do foolish commands. This is the first lesson on that class. – vonbrand Jun 21 '14 at 2:29
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    This doesn't help deletions through a GUI though, nor find . -iname "Earth*" -delete, or Midnight Commander, or , or , ... – lornix Jun 21 '14 at 2:30
  • The best solution in my opinion would be a script that changes rm. This script should check if the amount of data that you are trying to delete is greater than x MB. If it is greater than X it should ask you "are you really sure you want to delete this amount of data?" Do you think that this would be possible? – giovi321 Jun 21 '14 at 12:33
  • I mean, what road should I follow? I just need a path to follow, or a start point. – giovi321 Jun 21 '14 at 13:29
  • I think the chattr idea above is much better then what's going on here. Backups still good though. – Roman K. Jun 21 '14 at 16:43

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