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I am reading the man page of mount and clone.

I understand that mount is used to add a directory hierarchy to a mount point (a directory).

In clone's man page, under the CLONE_NEWNS section, they refer to mounts as the file hierarchy as seen by a process.

My question is that, is the term 'mount' being used to refer to the individual directories in the directory hierarchy seen by a process, and 'mount points' used to refer to the directories where file systems can be mounted ?

migrated from stackoverflow.com Apr 7 '14 at 18:32

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Id express it like this:

  • "mount points": locations in the file hierarchy where file systems have been mounted to
  • "mounts": the set of mounted file systems / the set of locations in the file hierarchy where file systems have been mounted to
  • "to mount": the action of mounting a file system into the file hierarchy

The view of a process to the file hierarchy does see the mounts insofar as it sees the file hierarchy. This includes those parts where file systems have been mounted into that hierarchy.

  • So you're saying : mount points = mounts (both are explained as: locations in the file hierarchy where file systems have been mounted to) ? – Jake Apr 5 '14 at 21:18
  • No, that is not what I wrote. Note the "the set" in the second bullet. For me this makes a difference, though indeed only a subtle. Maybe it would be better to label that bullet "the mounts"... – arkascha Apr 5 '14 at 21:20
  • So 1 mount = 1 mount point && mounts = set of all mount points ? – Jake Apr 5 '14 at 21:21
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    Hm, I'd say "a mount" is not so much "a mount point", but "a file system that is mounted" into the file hierarchy. I'd agree to the second statement. – arkascha Apr 5 '14 at 21:25
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    nice circular definitions. This answer can use some major changes. – jiggunjer Jan 11 '16 at 13:55

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