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One of my Hitachi DeskStar 7K160 hard disks died today and the other one is not safe (has bad sectors) so I've ordered a new 1 TB WD Blue WD10EZEX. Apparently nowadays new hard disks come with this Advanced Format technology. I don't know much about hard disk partitioning, cylinders, blocks, aligning &c. but as I read, wrong type of configuration can cause problems such as slower R/W speeds, loss of capacity &c.

This is how I would like to partition the new drive:

win7(NTFS) | storage1 (NTFS) | swap | debian jessie (EXT4) | storage2 (EXT4) *

Should I just use Debian's partition manager (on netinstall, I guess it's gparted based?) -as I always do- then install win7 (64-bit) and then install Debian and I should not encounter any problems? If not, should I worry about:

  • What partition manager should I employ?

  • This wiki suggest that I use GPT instead of MBR. But I have an old motherboard with BIOS, no UEFI. Can I use GPT at all?

  • Is having windows on the same hard disk with Debian gonna screw things up?

  • Just what is the correct procedure to partition this new hard disk?!

*: The order of the partitions can be different if this order is gonna cause problems.

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    I don't know about the GPT support of Windows, but GPT does work on BIOS systems perfectly well, so that is not an issue.
    – Marco
    Feb 13, 2014 at 22:08

1 Answer 1

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In short, you don't need to worry about it as partitioning tools were patched years ago to handle this. Also "Advanced Format" has nothing to do with GPT; you only need to use that for disks > 2 TiB or if you are using UEFI. Windows does not support GPT without UEFI.

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  • So should I go with MBR since if I make GPT then GRUB won't be able to boot Windows (since I have no UEFI)?
    – sterz
    Feb 14, 2014 at 4:10
  • @sterz, yep....
    – psusi
    Feb 14, 2014 at 4:21

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