1

I have a command that I use from the CLI to properly color files, folders, executables, etc. The command that I'm executing looks like this:

test -r ~/.dircolors && eval "$(dircolors -b ~/.dircolors)" || eval "$(dircolors -b)"

I'd like to run this command from inside a script, but it does not work:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

test -r ~/.dircolors && eval "$(dircolors -b ~/.dircolors)" || eval "$(dircolors -b)"

How can I excute this command inside a script? I can't figure out why this command doesn't work from within a script?

running /bin/bash -x myscript.sh produces the following output:

$ /bin/bash -x myscript.sh
+ test -r /home/turtle/.dircolors
+ dircolors -b /home/turtle/.dircolors
LS_COLORS='no=00;38;5;244:rs=0:di=00;38;5;33:ln=01;38;5;37:mh=00:pi=48;5;230;38;5;136;01:so=48;5;230;38;5;136;01:do=48;5;230;38;5;136;01:bd=48;5;230;38;5;244;01:cd=48;5;230;38;5;244;01:or=48;5;235;38;5;160:su=48;5;160;38;5;230:sg=48;5;136;38;5;230:ca=30;41:tw=48;5;64;38;5;230:ow=48;5;235;38;5;33:st=48;5;33;38;5;230:ex=01;38;5;64:*.tar=00;38;5;61:*.tgz=01;38;5;61:*.arj=01;38;5;61:*.taz=01;38;5;61:*.lzh=01;38;5;61:*.lzma=01;38;5;61:*.tlz=01;38;5;61:*.txz=01;38;5;61:*.zip=01;38;5;61:*.z=01;38;5;61:*.Z=01;38;5;61:*.dz=01;38;5;61:*.gz=01;38;5;61:*.lz=01;38;5;61:*.xz=01;38;5;61:*.bz2=01;38;5;61:*.bz=01;38;5;61:*.tbz=01;38;5;61:*.tbz2=01;38;5;61:*.tz=01;38;5;61:*.deb=01;38;5;61:*.rpm=01;38;5;61:*.jar=01;38;5;61:*.rar=01;38;5;61:*.ace=01;38;5;61:*.zoo=01;38;5;61:*.cpio=01;38;5;61:*.7z=01;38;5;61:*.rz=01;38;5;61:*.apk=01;38;5;61:*.gem=01;38;5;61:*.jpg=00;38;5;136:*.JPG=00;38;5;136:*.jpeg=00;38;5;136:*.gif=00;38;5;136:*.bmp=00;38;5;136:*.pbm=00;38;5;136:*.pgm=00;38;5;136:*.ppm=00;38;5;136:*.tga=00;38;5;136:*.xbm=00;38;5;136:*.xpm=00;38;5;136:*.tif=00;38;5;136:*.tiff=00;38;5;136:*.png=00;38;5;136:*.svg=00;38;5;136:*.svgz=00;38;5;136:*.mng=00;38;5;136:*.pcx=00;38;5;136:*.dl=00;38;5;136:*.xcf=00;38;5;136:*.xwd=00;38;5;136:*.yuv=00;38;5;136:*.cgm=00;38;5;136:*.emf=00;38;5;136:*.eps=00;38;5;136:*.CR2=00;38;5;136:*.ico=00;38;5;136:*.tex=01;38;5;245:*.rdf=01;38;5;245:*.owl=01;38;5;245:*.n3=01;38;5;245:*.ttl=01;38;5;245:*.nt=01;38;5;245:*.torrent=01;38;5;245:*.xml=01;38;5;245:*Makefile=01;38;5;245:*Rakefile=01;38;5;245:*build.xml=01;38;5;245:*rc=01;38;5;245:*1=01;38;5;245:*.nfo=01;38;5;245:*README=01;38;5;245:*README.txt=01;38;5;245:*readme.txt=01;38;5;245:*.md=01;38;5;245:*README.markdown=01;38;5;245:*.ini=01;38;5;245:*.yml=01;38;5;245:*.cfg=01;38;5;245:*.conf=01;38;5;245:*.c=01;38;5;245:*.cpp=01;38;5;245:*.cc=01;38;5;245:*.log=00;38;5;240:*.bak=00;38;5;240:*.aux=00;38;5;240:*.lof=00;38;5;240:*.lol=00;38;5;240:*.lot=00;38;5;240:*.out=00;38;5;240:*.toc=00;38;5;240:*.bbl=00;38;5;240:*.blg=00;38;5;240:*~=00;38;5;240:*#=00;38;5;240:*.part=00;38;5;240:*.incomplete=00;38;5;240:*.swp=00;38;5;240:*.tmp=00;38;5;240:*.temp=00;38;5;240:*.o=00;38;5;240:*.pyc=00;38;5;240:*.class=00;38;5;240:*.cache=00;38;5;240:*.aac=00;38;5;166:*.au=00;38;5;166:*.flac=00;38;5;166:*.mid=00;38;5;166:*.midi=00;38;5;166:*.mka=00;38;5;166:*.mp3=00;38;5;166:*.mpc=00;38;5;166:*.ogg=00;38;5;166:*.ra=00;38;5;166:*.wav=00;38;5;166:*.m4a=00;38;5;166:*.axa=00;38;5;166:*.oga=00;38;5;166:*.spx=00;38;5;166:*.xspf=00;38;5;166:*.mov=01;38;5;166:*.mpg=01;38;5;166:*.mpeg=01;38;5;166:*.m2v=01;38;5;166:*.mkv=01;38;5;166:*.ogm=01;38;5;166:*.mp4=01;38;5;166:*.m4v=01;38;5;166:*.mp4v=01;38;5;166:*.vob=01;38;5;166:*.qt=01;38;5;166:*.nuv=01;38;5;166:*.wmv=01;38;5;166:*.asf=01;38;5;166:*.rm=01;38;5;166:*.rmvb=01;38;5;166:*.flc=01;38;5;166:*.avi=01;38;5;166:*.fli=01;38;5;166:*.flv=01;38;5;166:*.gl=01;38;5;166:*.m2ts=01;38;5;166:*.divx=01;38;5;166:*.webm=01;38;5;166:*.axv=01;38;5;166:*.anx=01;38;5;166:*.ogv=01;38;5;166:*.ogx=01;38;5;166:';

export LS_COLORS

2 Answers 2

2

First you create the script containing your command and with /bin/bash as the interpreter; as follows :

#!/bin/bash
test -r ~/.dircolors && eval "$(dircolors -b ~/.dircolors)" || eval "$(dircolors -b)"

If you named your script for example setDirColors and you make it executable, you should execute it as follows :

. ./setDirColors

Note the leading dot. It is not a typo. Calling your script without the leading dot will not work. Why is that so ? Your script set a value to LS_COLORS environment variable and "export" it ... to subprocesses of the script ! not to its parent !

To solve this classic pitfall, we use the leading dot which is a bash command to execute a script in current process. So the script can modify your current LS_COLORS environment variable.

1
  • Thank you! I would have never figured that out, your response is most appreciated. This worked!
    – turtle
    Commented Dec 9, 2013 at 22:53
0
test -r ~/.dircolors && dircolors -b ~/.dircolors || dircolors -b
3
  • thanks for the help, unfortunately this doesn't work.
    – turtle
    Commented Dec 9, 2013 at 21:18
  • What error does it give you? Try '/bin/bash -x script.sh'
    – Luke
    Commented Dec 9, 2013 at 21:48
  • I've added the output from /bin/bash -x script.sh above. So strange. The command works just fine from the CLI, just not in a script.
    – turtle
    Commented Dec 9, 2013 at 22:32

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .