1

I have a command that I use from the CLI to properly color files, folders, executables, etc. The command that I'm executing looks like this:

test -r ~/.dircolors && eval "$(dircolors -b ~/.dircolors)" || eval "$(dircolors -b)"

I'd like to run this command from inside a script, but it does not work:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

test -r ~/.dircolors && eval "$(dircolors -b ~/.dircolors)" || eval "$(dircolors -b)"

How can I excute this command inside a script? I can't figure out why this command doesn't work from within a script?

running /bin/bash -x myscript.sh produces the following output:

$ /bin/bash -x myscript.sh
+ test -r /home/turtle/.dircolors
+ dircolors -b /home/turtle/.dircolors
LS_COLORS='no=00;38;5;244:rs=0:di=00;38;5;33:ln=01;38;5;37:mh=00:pi=48;5;230;38;5;136;01:so=48;5;230;38;5;136;01:do=48;5;230;38;5;136;01:bd=48;5;230;38;5;244;01:cd=48;5;230;38;5;244;01:or=48;5;235;38;5;160:su=48;5;160;38;5;230:sg=48;5;136;38;5;230:ca=30;41:tw=48;5;64;38;5;230:ow=48;5;235;38;5;33:st=48;5;33;38;5;230:ex=01;38;5;64:*.tar=00;38;5;61:*.tgz=01;38;5;61:*.arj=01;38;5;61:*.taz=01;38;5;61:*.lzh=01;38;5;61:*.lzma=01;38;5;61:*.tlz=01;38;5;61:*.txz=01;38;5;61:*.zip=01;38;5;61:*.z=01;38;5;61:*.Z=01;38;5;61:*.dz=01;38;5;61:*.gz=01;38;5;61:*.lz=01;38;5;61:*.xz=01;38;5;61:*.bz2=01;38;5;61:*.bz=01;38;5;61:*.tbz=01;38;5;61:*.tbz2=01;38;5;61:*.tz=01;38;5;61:*.deb=01;38;5;61:*.rpm=01;38;5;61:*.jar=01;38;5;61:*.rar=01;38;5;61:*.ace=01;38;5;61:*.zoo=01;38;5;61:*.cpio=01;38;5;61:*.7z=01;38;5;61:*.rz=01;38;5;61:*.apk=01;38;5;61:*.gem=01;38;5;61:*.jpg=00;38;5;136:*.JPG=00;38;5;136:*.jpeg=00;38;5;136:*.gif=00;38;5;136:*.bmp=00;38;5;136:*.pbm=00;38;5;136:*.pgm=00;38;5;136:*.ppm=00;38;5;136:*.tga=00;38;5;136:*.xbm=00;38;5;136:*.xpm=00;38;5;136:*.tif=00;38;5;136:*.tiff=00;38;5;136:*.png=00;38;5;136:*.svg=00;38;5;136:*.svgz=00;38;5;136:*.mng=00;38;5;136:*.pcx=00;38;5;136:*.dl=00;38;5;136:*.xcf=00;38;5;136:*.xwd=00;38;5;136:*.yuv=00;38;5;136:*.cgm=00;38;5;136:*.emf=00;38;5;136:*.eps=00;38;5;136:*.CR2=00;38;5;136:*.ico=00;38;5;136:*.tex=01;38;5;245:*.rdf=01;38;5;245:*.owl=01;38;5;245:*.n3=01;38;5;245:*.ttl=01;38;5;245:*.nt=01;38;5;245:*.torrent=01;38;5;245:*.xml=01;38;5;245:*Makefile=01;38;5;245:*Rakefile=01;38;5;245:*build.xml=01;38;5;245:*rc=01;38;5;245:*1=01;38;5;245:*.nfo=01;38;5;245:*README=01;38;5;245:*README.txt=01;38;5;245:*readme.txt=01;38;5;245:*.md=01;38;5;245:*README.markdown=01;38;5;245:*.ini=01;38;5;245:*.yml=01;38;5;245:*.cfg=01;38;5;245:*.conf=01;38;5;245:*.c=01;38;5;245:*.cpp=01;38;5;245:*.cc=01;38;5;245:*.log=00;38;5;240:*.bak=00;38;5;240:*.aux=00;38;5;240:*.lof=00;38;5;240:*.lol=00;38;5;240:*.lot=00;38;5;240:*.out=00;38;5;240:*.toc=00;38;5;240:*.bbl=00;38;5;240:*.blg=00;38;5;240:*~=00;38;5;240:*#=00;38;5;240:*.part=00;38;5;240:*.incomplete=00;38;5;240:*.swp=00;38;5;240:*.tmp=00;38;5;240:*.temp=00;38;5;240:*.o=00;38;5;240:*.pyc=00;38;5;240:*.class=00;38;5;240:*.cache=00;38;5;240:*.aac=00;38;5;166:*.au=00;38;5;166:*.flac=00;38;5;166:*.mid=00;38;5;166:*.midi=00;38;5;166:*.mka=00;38;5;166:*.mp3=00;38;5;166:*.mpc=00;38;5;166:*.ogg=00;38;5;166:*.ra=00;38;5;166:*.wav=00;38;5;166:*.m4a=00;38;5;166:*.axa=00;38;5;166:*.oga=00;38;5;166:*.spx=00;38;5;166:*.xspf=00;38;5;166:*.mov=01;38;5;166:*.mpg=01;38;5;166:*.mpeg=01;38;5;166:*.m2v=01;38;5;166:*.mkv=01;38;5;166:*.ogm=01;38;5;166:*.mp4=01;38;5;166:*.m4v=01;38;5;166:*.mp4v=01;38;5;166:*.vob=01;38;5;166:*.qt=01;38;5;166:*.nuv=01;38;5;166:*.wmv=01;38;5;166:*.asf=01;38;5;166:*.rm=01;38;5;166:*.rmvb=01;38;5;166:*.flc=01;38;5;166:*.avi=01;38;5;166:*.fli=01;38;5;166:*.flv=01;38;5;166:*.gl=01;38;5;166:*.m2ts=01;38;5;166:*.divx=01;38;5;166:*.webm=01;38;5;166:*.axv=01;38;5;166:*.anx=01;38;5;166:*.ogv=01;38;5;166:*.ogx=01;38;5;166:';

export LS_COLORS

2

First you create the script containing your command and with /bin/bash as the interpreter; as follows :

#!/bin/bash
test -r ~/.dircolors && eval "$(dircolors -b ~/.dircolors)" || eval "$(dircolors -b)"

If you named your script for example setDirColors and you make it executable, you should execute it as follows :

. ./setDirColors

Note the leading dot. It is not a typo. Calling your script without the leading dot will not work. Why is that so ? Your script set a value to LS_COLORS environment variable and "export" it ... to subprocesses of the script ! not to its parent !

To solve this classic pitfall, we use the leading dot which is a bash command to execute a script in current process. So the script can modify your current LS_COLORS environment variable.

  • Thank you! I would have never figured that out, your response is most appreciated. This worked! – turtle Dec 9 '13 at 22:53
0
test -r ~/.dircolors && dircolors -b ~/.dircolors || dircolors -b
  • thanks for the help, unfortunately this doesn't work. – turtle Dec 9 '13 at 21:18
  • What error does it give you? Try '/bin/bash -x script.sh' – Luke Dec 9 '13 at 21:48
  • I've added the output from /bin/bash -x script.sh above. So strange. The command works just fine from the CLI, just not in a script. – turtle Dec 9 '13 at 22:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.