3 punctuation
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On Linux, traditional DOS-partitions will show up this way:

  • Partitions from 1 to 4 are primary partitions.
  • Partitions above 5 are logical partitions.

In the DOS-partitioning-scheme (this is not Linux-specific), if you want to use logical partitions you have to define a pointer within one of the primary partitions for these. At this pointer the BIOS will find further information.

This pointer (sda2 in your machine) shows in fdisk as id 5 "Extended" - it extends the partitioning-scheme to more than the default 4 partitions normally possible.

Now your system consists of two partitions:

One primary, bootable partition: sda1 (which was or is part of a linux-raid-array) and one logical partition: sda5 (which was or is part of a linux-raid-array).

There is no place left for additional partitions.

On Linux traditional DOS-partitions will show up this way:

  • Partitions from 1 to 4 are primary partitions
  • Partitions above 5 are logical partitions.

In the DOS-partitioning-scheme (this is not Linux-specific) if you want to use logical partitions you have to define a pointer within one of the primary partitions for these. At this pointer the BIOS will find further information.

This pointer (sda2) shows in fdisk as id 5 "Extended" - it extends the partitioning-scheme to more than the default 4 partitions normally possible.

Now your system consists of two partitions:

One primary, bootable partition: sda1 (which was or is part of a linux-raid-array) and one logical partition: sda5 (which was or is part of a linux-raid-array).

There is no place left for additional partitions.

On Linux, traditional DOS-partitions will show up this way:

  • Partitions from 1 to 4 are primary partitions.
  • Partitions above 5 are logical partitions.

In the DOS-partitioning-scheme (this is not Linux-specific), if you want to use logical partitions you have to define a pointer within one of the primary partitions for these. At this pointer the BIOS will find further information.

This pointer (sda2 in your machine) shows in fdisk as id 5 "Extended" - it extends the partitioning-scheme to more than the default 4 partitions normally possible.

Now your system consists of two partitions:

One primary, bootable partition: sda1 (which was or is part of a linux-raid-array) and one logical partition: sda5 (which was or is part of a linux-raid-array).

There is no place left for additional partitions.

2 corrected extended to logical where applicable
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On Linux traditional DOS-partitions will show up this way:

  • Partitions from 1 to 4 are primary partitions
  • Partitions above 5 are extendedlogical partitions.

In the DOS-partitioning-scheme (this is not Linux-specific) if you want to use extendedlogical partitions you have to define a pointer within one of the primary partitions for these. At this pointer the BIOS will find further information.

This pointer (sda2) shows in fdisk as id 5 "Extended" - it extends the partitioning-scheme to more than the default 4 partitions normally possible.

Now your system consists of two partitions:

One primary, bootable partition: sda1 (which was or is part of a linux-raid-array) and one extendedlogical partition: sda5 (which was or is part of a linux-raid-array).

There is no place left for additional partitions.

On Linux traditional DOS-partitions will show up this way:

  • Partitions from 1 to 4 are primary partitions
  • Partitions above 5 are extended partitions.

In the DOS-partitioning-scheme (this is not Linux-specific) if you want to use extended partitions you have to define a pointer within one of the primary partitions for these. At this pointer the BIOS will find further information.

This pointer (sda2) shows in fdisk as id 5 "Extended"

Now your system consists of two partitions:

One primary, bootable partition: sda1 (which was or is part of a linux-raid-array) and one extended partition: sda5 (which was or is part of a linux-raid-array).

There is no place left for additional partitions.

On Linux traditional DOS-partitions will show up this way:

  • Partitions from 1 to 4 are primary partitions
  • Partitions above 5 are logical partitions.

In the DOS-partitioning-scheme (this is not Linux-specific) if you want to use logical partitions you have to define a pointer within one of the primary partitions for these. At this pointer the BIOS will find further information.

This pointer (sda2) shows in fdisk as id 5 "Extended" - it extends the partitioning-scheme to more than the default 4 partitions normally possible.

Now your system consists of two partitions:

One primary, bootable partition: sda1 (which was or is part of a linux-raid-array) and one logical partition: sda5 (which was or is part of a linux-raid-array).

There is no place left for additional partitions.

1
source | link

On Linux traditional DOS-partitions will show up this way:

  • Partitions from 1 to 4 are primary partitions
  • Partitions above 5 are extended partitions.

In the DOS-partitioning-scheme (this is not Linux-specific) if you want to use extended partitions you have to define a pointer within one of the primary partitions for these. At this pointer the BIOS will find further information.

This pointer (sda2) shows in fdisk as id 5 "Extended"

Now your system consists of two partitions:

One primary, bootable partition: sda1 (which was or is part of a linux-raid-array) and one extended partition: sda5 (which was or is part of a linux-raid-array).

There is no place left for additional partitions.