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I'm having DNS resolution issues in various contexts which appear to trace back to my networking configuration.

I'm running just the dnsmasq-basednsmasq-base installation of dnsmasqdnsmasq on two Linux installations (Lubuntu 12.04 and 12.10). I haven't done anything in particular to configure dnsmasqdnsmasq, but I think some other changes I made previously may have lead to an incorrect configuration when upgrading.

The working configuration on machine 'A' running 12.04 sets /etc/resolv.conf to use 127.0.1.1 (which in /etc/hosts is set to $HOSTNAME) On machine 'B' where certain applications such as OpenVPN experience DNS resolution issues, /etc/resolv.conf is set to 192.168.1.1, which is my gateway IP. Only certain applications are affected. Web-browsing, for example, works just fine.

Any idea if this difference is the cause of the DNS resolution issues, and why 'B' is behaving differently?

Edits:

Both 'A' and 'B' are running dnsmasqdnsmasq, both are using DHCP to get DNS configuration, and I'm only using dnsmasq for DNS.

There is no /etc/dnsmasq.conf/etc/dnsmasq.conf file. I understand that this is normal when running just dnsmasq-basednsmasq-base.

The contents of /etc/resolvconf/etc/resolvconf on the two machines appear to be identical. No extraneous/missing files.

Sorry I can't be more specific about the nature of the problem. "DNS resolution issue" was the end-point of my discussion with technical support at my VPN provider.

I'm having DNS resolution issues in various contexts which appear to trace back to my networking configuration.

I'm running just the dnsmasq-base installation of dnsmasq on two Linux installations (Lubuntu 12.04 and 12.10). I haven't done anything in particular to configure dnsmasq, but I think some other changes I made previously may have lead to an incorrect configuration when upgrading.

The working configuration on machine 'A' running 12.04 sets /etc/resolv.conf to use 127.0.1.1 (which in /etc/hosts is set to $HOSTNAME) On machine 'B' where certain applications such as OpenVPN experience DNS resolution issues, /etc/resolv.conf is set to 192.168.1.1, which is my gateway IP. Only certain applications are affected. Web-browsing, for example, works just fine.

Any idea if this difference is the cause of the DNS resolution issues, and why 'B' is behaving differently?

Edits:

Both 'A' and 'B' are running dnsmasq, both are using DHCP to get DNS configuration, and I'm only using dnsmasq for DNS.

There is no /etc/dnsmasq.conf file. I understand that this is normal when running just dnsmasq-base.

The contents of /etc/resolvconf on the two machines appear to be identical. No extraneous/missing files.

Sorry I can't be more specific about the nature of the problem. "DNS resolution issue" was the end-point of my discussion with technical support at my VPN provider.

I'm having DNS resolution issues in various contexts which appear to trace back to my networking configuration.

I'm running just the dnsmasq-base installation of dnsmasq on two Linux installations (Lubuntu 12.04 and 12.10). I haven't done anything in particular to configure dnsmasq, but I think some other changes I made previously may have lead to an incorrect configuration when upgrading.

The working configuration on machine 'A' running 12.04 sets /etc/resolv.conf to use 127.0.1.1 (which in /etc/hosts is set to $HOSTNAME) On machine 'B' where certain applications such as OpenVPN experience DNS resolution issues, /etc/resolv.conf is set to 192.168.1.1, which is my gateway IP. Only certain applications are affected. Web-browsing, for example, works just fine.

Any idea if this difference is the cause of the DNS resolution issues, and why 'B' is behaving differently?

Edits:

Both 'A' and 'B' are running dnsmasq, both are using DHCP to get DNS configuration, and I'm only using dnsmasq for DNS.

There is no /etc/dnsmasq.conf file. I understand that this is normal when running just dnsmasq-base.

The contents of /etc/resolvconf on the two machines appear to be identical. No extraneous/missing files.

Sorry I can't be more specific about the nature of the problem. "DNS resolution issue" was the end-point of my discussion with technical support at my VPN provider.

4 s/netmasq/dnsmasq/
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I'm having DNS resolution issues in various contexts which appear to trace back to my networking configuration.

I'm running just the netmasqdnsmasq-base installation of netmasqdnsmasq on two Linux installations (Lubuntu 12.04 and 12.10). I haven't done anything in particular to configure netmasqdnsmasq, but I think some other changes I made previously may have lead to an incorrect configuration when upgrading.

The working configuration on machine 'A' running 12.04 sets /etc/resolv.conf to use 127.0.1.1 (which in /etc/hosts is set to $HOSTNAME) On machine 'B' where certain applications such as OpenVPN experience DNS resolution issues, /etc/resolv.conf is set to 192.168.1.1, which is my gateway IP. Only certain applications are affected. Web-browsing, for example, works just fine.

Any idea if this difference is the cause of the DNS resolution issues, and why 'B' is behaving differently?

Edits:

Both 'A' and 'B' are running dnsmasq, both are using DHCP to get DNS configuration, and I'm only using dnsmasq for DNS.

There is no /etc/dnsmasq.conf file. I understand that this is normal when running just dnsmasq-base.

The contents of /etc/resolvconf on the two machines appear to be identical. No extraneous/missing files.

Sorry I can't be more specific about the nature of the problem. "DNS resolution issue" was the end-point of my discussion with technical support at my VPN provider.

I'm having DNS resolution issues in various contexts which appear to trace back to my networking configuration.

I'm running just the netmasq-base installation of netmasq on two Linux installations (Lubuntu 12.04 and 12.10). I haven't done anything in particular to configure netmasq, but I think some other changes I made previously may have lead to an incorrect configuration when upgrading.

The working configuration on machine 'A' running 12.04 sets /etc/resolv.conf to use 127.0.1.1 (which in /etc/hosts is set to $HOSTNAME) On machine 'B' where certain applications such as OpenVPN experience DNS resolution issues, /etc/resolv.conf is set to 192.168.1.1, which is my gateway IP. Only certain applications are affected. Web-browsing, for example, works just fine.

Any idea if this difference is the cause of the DNS resolution issues, and why 'B' is behaving differently?

Edits:

Both 'A' and 'B' are running dnsmasq, both are using DHCP to get DNS configuration, and I'm only using dnsmasq for DNS.

There is no /etc/dnsmasq.conf file. I understand that this is normal when running just dnsmasq-base.

The contents of /etc/resolvconf on the two machines appear to be identical. No extraneous/missing files.

Sorry I can't be more specific about the nature of the problem. "DNS resolution issue" was the end-point of my discussion with technical support at my VPN provider.

I'm having DNS resolution issues in various contexts which appear to trace back to my networking configuration.

I'm running just the dnsmasq-base installation of dnsmasq on two Linux installations (Lubuntu 12.04 and 12.10). I haven't done anything in particular to configure dnsmasq, but I think some other changes I made previously may have lead to an incorrect configuration when upgrading.

The working configuration on machine 'A' running 12.04 sets /etc/resolv.conf to use 127.0.1.1 (which in /etc/hosts is set to $HOSTNAME) On machine 'B' where certain applications such as OpenVPN experience DNS resolution issues, /etc/resolv.conf is set to 192.168.1.1, which is my gateway IP. Only certain applications are affected. Web-browsing, for example, works just fine.

Any idea if this difference is the cause of the DNS resolution issues, and why 'B' is behaving differently?

Edits:

Both 'A' and 'B' are running dnsmasq, both are using DHCP to get DNS configuration, and I'm only using dnsmasq for DNS.

There is no /etc/dnsmasq.conf file. I understand that this is normal when running just dnsmasq-base.

The contents of /etc/resolvconf on the two machines appear to be identical. No extraneous/missing files.

Sorry I can't be more specific about the nature of the problem. "DNS resolution issue" was the end-point of my discussion with technical support at my VPN provider.

    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackUnix/status/334324724454789120
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I'm having DNS resolution issues in various contexts which appear to trace back to my networking configuration.

I'm running just the netmasq-base installation of netmasq on two Linux installations (Lubuntu 12.04 and 12.10). I haven't done anything in particular to configure netmasq, but I think some other changes I made previously may have lead to an incorrect configuration when upgrading.

The working configuration on machine 'A' running 12.04 sets /etc/resolv.conf to use 127.0.1.1 (which in /etc/hosts is set to $HOSTNAME) On machine 'B' where certain applications such as OpenVPN experience DNS resolution issues, /etc/resolv.conf is set to 192.168.1.1, which is my gateway IP. Only certain applications are affected. Web-browsing, for example, works just fine.

Any idea if this difference is the cause of the DNS resolution issues, and why 'B' is behaving differently?

Edits:

Both 'A' and 'B' are running dnsmasq, both are using DHCP to get DNS configuration, and I'm only using dnsmasq for DNS.

There is no /etc/dnsmasq.conf file. I understand that this is normal when running just dnsmasq-base.

The contents of /etc/resolvconf on the two machines appear to be identical. No extraneous/missing files.

Sorry I can't be more specific about the nature of the problem. "DNS resolution issue" was the end-point of my discussion with technical support at my VPN provider.

I'm having DNS resolution issues in various contexts which appear to trace back to my networking configuration.

I'm running just the netmasq-base installation of netmasq on two Linux installations (Lubuntu 12.04 and 12.10). I haven't done anything in particular to configure netmasq, but I think some other changes I made previously may have lead to an incorrect configuration when upgrading.

The working configuration on machine 'A' running 12.04 sets /etc/resolv.conf to use 127.0.1.1 (which in /etc/hosts is set to $HOSTNAME) On machine 'B' where certain applications such as OpenVPN experience DNS resolution issues, /etc/resolv.conf is set to 192.168.1.1, which is my gateway IP. Only certain applications are affected. Web-browsing, for example, works just fine.

Any idea if this difference is the cause of the DNS resolution issues, and why 'B' is behaving differently?

I'm having DNS resolution issues in various contexts which appear to trace back to my networking configuration.

I'm running just the netmasq-base installation of netmasq on two Linux installations (Lubuntu 12.04 and 12.10). I haven't done anything in particular to configure netmasq, but I think some other changes I made previously may have lead to an incorrect configuration when upgrading.

The working configuration on machine 'A' running 12.04 sets /etc/resolv.conf to use 127.0.1.1 (which in /etc/hosts is set to $HOSTNAME) On machine 'B' where certain applications such as OpenVPN experience DNS resolution issues, /etc/resolv.conf is set to 192.168.1.1, which is my gateway IP. Only certain applications are affected. Web-browsing, for example, works just fine.

Any idea if this difference is the cause of the DNS resolution issues, and why 'B' is behaving differently?

Edits:

Both 'A' and 'B' are running dnsmasq, both are using DHCP to get DNS configuration, and I'm only using dnsmasq for DNS.

There is no /etc/dnsmasq.conf file. I understand that this is normal when running just dnsmasq-base.

The contents of /etc/resolvconf on the two machines appear to be identical. No extraneous/missing files.

Sorry I can't be more specific about the nature of the problem. "DNS resolution issue" was the end-point of my discussion with technical support at my VPN provider.

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