3 added 1 characters in body
source | link

Thoroughly reread ddrescue manual and found out the following option:

-m file
--domain-logfile=file
Restrict

Restrict the rescue domain to the blocks marked as finished in the logfile file. This is useful if the destination drive fails during the rescue.

So the invocation of ddrescue would look something like this:

# ddrescue -d -b 4096 -m sda1.log /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1.img logfile2.log

Thoroughly reread ddrescue manual and found out the following option:

-m file
--domain-logfile=file
Restrict the rescue domain to the blocks marked as finished in the logfile file. This is useful if the destination drive fails during the rescue.

So the invocation of ddrescue would look something like this:

# ddrescue -d -b 4096 -m sda1.log /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1.img logfile2.log

Thoroughly reread ddrescue manual and found out the following option:

-m file
--domain-logfile=file

Restrict the rescue domain to the blocks marked as finished in the logfile file. This is useful if the destination drive fails during the rescue.

So the invocation of ddrescue would look something like this:

# ddrescue -d -b 4096 -m sda1.log /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1.img logfile2.log
2 added 13 characters in body
source | link

Thoroughly reread ddrescue manual and found out the following option:

-m file
--domain-logfile=file
Restrict the rescue domain to the blocks marked as finished in the logfile file. This is useful if the destination drive fails during the rescue.

So the invocation of ddrescue would look something like this:

# ddrescue -d -b 4096 -m sda1.log /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1.img logfile2.log

Thoroughly reread ddrescue manual and found out the following option:

-m file
--domain-logfile=file
Restrict the rescue domain to the blocks marked as finished in the logfile file. This is useful if the destination drive fails during the rescue.

So the invocation of ddrescue would look something like this:

# ddrescue -d -b 4096 -m sda1.log /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1.img

Thoroughly reread ddrescue manual and found out the following option:

-m file
--domain-logfile=file
Restrict the rescue domain to the blocks marked as finished in the logfile file. This is useful if the destination drive fails during the rescue.

So the invocation of ddrescue would look something like this:

# ddrescue -d -b 4096 -m sda1.log /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1.img logfile2.log
1
source | link

Thoroughly reread ddrescue manual and found out the following option:

-m file
--domain-logfile=file
Restrict the rescue domain to the blocks marked as finished in the logfile file. This is useful if the destination drive fails during the rescue.

So the invocation of ddrescue would look something like this:

# ddrescue -d -b 4096 -m sda1.log /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1.img
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