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3 Removed questions 3 to 8 and Pfsense part
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(I couldn't really choose an accurate title as I don't know exactly what the feature I'm looking for is called. Sorry about that. I hope that the following lines may clear this aspect.)

I own a dozen PCs, mostly running UNIX-based OSes (FreeBSD and various flavors of GNU/Linux), with a few running Windows 7 or Windows XP.

I'd like to begin centralizing all my data on one machine running FreeBSD as well as acting as my NAS with ZFS.

Furthermore I'd like to have a central system to manage users, password, groups that are common to some (or all) of my machines. Basically I'd like to edit my password on the master server and then being able to login on any of my PCs using the new password (without needing to update dozens of times the same user's password). I think as far as this goes that's what LDAP (or maybe even Kerberos?) does, though I'm not sure about the Windows support.

I'd also like to configure my Pfsense router to allow OpenVPN logins from remote locations, "redirecting" the authentication part to my NAS, then being able to freely access my files on the NAS or any other box. This maybe would only be related to firewall configuration though ...

My questions are the following

  1. What should I use for a home-based environment with 1-3 human users (beside all UNIXes users like root, ...)? LDAP / Kerberos / Windows Server 2008?
  2. Does (the one on point 1.) support Windows 7 / Windows XP?

  3. If I configure Pfsense to "redirect" authentication to my NAS / Windows Server (depends on point 1.), should I login once more in order to access my files? Or it all depends on the Samba / NFS sharing settings (basically: allow all connections from local network)? If I have to authenticate on the NAS it would be safe and practical at the same time, though I'm not sure about the procedure if I were to use Windows Server 2008

  4. Have also a local authentication alternative (when I'm on a trip I may not be able to connect remotely to my authentication server). Like what is available on Windows (typically when you press CTRL + ALT + DEL at the computer's boot, you can choose the domain to log on to). Is this also available on GNU/Linux? If so, how is it called?

  5. Do (point 1.) authentication replace local user authentication or is it "just" an add-on (in the sense that the user that may authenticate on a given machine are local users as well as LDAP/Kerberos/... users)?

  6. Security related problems?

  7. Other significant information to keep in mind when doing centralized authentication?

  8. What if a user name gets duplicated? Would this be solved like in Windows' login domain feature?

    Does (the one on point 1.) support Windows 7 / Windows XP acting as client?

I already plan to mount shares on each PC I work on via Samba, which would provide a centralized and redundant data storage.

I hope I explained in a clear way what I'd like to do. I'm sorry if I got some technical terms wrong. Please don't hesitate to reply or ask for clarifications.

(I couldn't really choose an accurate title as I don't know exactly what the feature I'm looking for is called. Sorry about that. I hope that the following lines may clear this aspect.)

I own a dozen PCs, mostly running UNIX-based OSes (FreeBSD and various flavors of GNU/Linux), with a few running Windows 7 or Windows XP.

I'd like to begin centralizing all my data on one machine running FreeBSD as well as acting as my NAS with ZFS.

Furthermore I'd like to have a central system to manage users, password, groups that are common to some (or all) of my machines. Basically I'd like to edit my password on the master server and then being able to login on any of my PCs using the new password (without needing to update dozens of times the same user's password). I think as far as this goes that's what LDAP (or maybe even Kerberos?) does, though I'm not sure about the Windows support.

I'd also like to configure my Pfsense router to allow OpenVPN logins from remote locations, "redirecting" the authentication part to my NAS, then being able to freely access my files on the NAS or any other box. This maybe would only be related to firewall configuration though ...

My questions are the following

  1. What should I use for a home-based environment with 1-3 human users (beside all UNIXes users like root, ...)? LDAP / Kerberos / Windows Server 2008?
  2. Does (the one on point 1.) support Windows 7 / Windows XP?

  3. If I configure Pfsense to "redirect" authentication to my NAS / Windows Server (depends on point 1.), should I login once more in order to access my files? Or it all depends on the Samba / NFS sharing settings (basically: allow all connections from local network)? If I have to authenticate on the NAS it would be safe and practical at the same time, though I'm not sure about the procedure if I were to use Windows Server 2008

  4. Have also a local authentication alternative (when I'm on a trip I may not be able to connect remotely to my authentication server). Like what is available on Windows (typically when you press CTRL + ALT + DEL at the computer's boot, you can choose the domain to log on to). Is this also available on GNU/Linux? If so, how is it called?

  5. Do (point 1.) authentication replace local user authentication or is it "just" an add-on (in the sense that the user that may authenticate on a given machine are local users as well as LDAP/Kerberos/... users)?

  6. Security related problems?

  7. Other significant information to keep in mind when doing centralized authentication?

  8. What if a user name gets duplicated? Would this be solved like in Windows' login domain feature?

I already plan to mount shares on each PC I work on via Samba, which would provide a centralized and redundant data storage.

I hope I explained in a clear way what I'd like to do. I'm sorry if I got some technical terms wrong. Please don't hesitate to reply or ask for clarifications.

(I couldn't really choose an accurate title as I don't know exactly what the feature I'm looking for is called. Sorry about that. I hope that the following lines may clear this aspect.)

I own a dozen PCs, mostly running UNIX-based OSes (FreeBSD and various flavors of GNU/Linux), with a few running Windows 7 or Windows XP.

I'd like to begin centralizing all my data on one machine running FreeBSD as well as acting as my NAS with ZFS.

Furthermore I'd like to have a central system to manage users, password, groups that are common to some (or all) of my machines. Basically I'd like to edit my password on the master server and then being able to login on any of my PCs using the new password (without needing to update dozens of times the same user's password). I think as far as this goes that's what LDAP (or maybe even Kerberos?) does, though I'm not sure about the Windows support.

My questions are the following

  1. What should I use for a home-based environment with 1-3 human users (beside all UNIXes users like root, ...)? LDAP / Kerberos / Windows Server 2008?
  2. Does (the one on point 1.) support Windows 7 / Windows XP acting as client?

I already plan to mount shares on each PC I work on via Samba, which would provide a centralized and redundant data storage.

I hope I explained in a clear way what I'd like to do. I'm sorry if I got some technical terms wrong. Please don't hesitate to reply or ask for clarifications.

2 Deleted question 9 (Is it "worth the trouble"?)
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(I couldn't really choose an accurate title as I don't know exactly what the feature I'm looking for is called. Sorry about that. I hope that the following lines may clear this aspect.)

I own a dozen PCs, mostly running UNIX-based OSes (FreeBSD and various flavors of GNU/Linux), with a few running Windows 7 or Windows XP.

I'd like to begin centralizing all my data on one machine running FreeBSD as well as acting as my NAS with ZFS.

Furthermore I'd like to have a central system to manage users, password, groups that are common to some (or all) of my machines. Basically I'd like to edit my password on the master server and then being able to login on any of my PCs using the new password (without needing to update dozens of times the same user's password). I think as far as this goes that's what LDAP (or maybe even Kerberos?) does, though I'm not sure about the Windows support.

I'd also like to configure my Pfsense router to allow OpenVPN logins from remote locations, "redirecting" the authentication part to my NAS, then being able to freely access my files on the NAS or any other box. This maybe would only be related to firewall configuration though ...

My questions are the following

  1. What should I use for a home-based environment with 1-3 human users (beside all UNIXes users like root, ...)? LDAP / Kerberos / Windows Server 2008?
  2. Does (the one on point 1.) support Windows 7 / Windows XP?

  3. If I configure Pfsense to "redirect" authentication to my NAS / Windows Server (depends on point 1.), should I login once more in order to access my files? Or it all depends on the Samba / NFS sharing settings (basically: allow all connections from local network)? If I have to authenticate on the NAS it would be safe and practical at the same time, though I'm not sure about the procedure if I were to use Windows Server 2008

  4. Have also a local authentication alternative (when I'm on a trip I may not be able to connect remotely to my authentication server). Like what is available on Windows (typically when you press CTRL + ALT + DEL at the computer's boot, you can choose the domain to log on to). Is this also available on GNU/Linux? If so, how is it called?

  5. Do (point 1.) authentication replace local user authentication or is it "just" an add-on (in the sense that the user that may authenticate on a given machine are local users as well as LDAP/Kerberos/... users)?

  6. Security related problems?

  7. Other significant information to keep in mind when doing centralized authentication?

  8. What if a user name gets duplicated? Would this be solved like in Windows' login domain feature?

  9. Do you think doing this is "worth the trouble"?

I already plan to mount shares on each PC I work on via Samba, which would provide a centralized and redundant data storage.

I hope I explained in a clear way what I'd like to do. I'm sorry if I got some technical terms wrong. Please don't hesitate to reply or ask for clarifications.

(I couldn't really choose an accurate title as I don't know exactly what the feature I'm looking for is called. Sorry about that. I hope that the following lines may clear this aspect.)

I own a dozen PCs, mostly running UNIX-based OSes (FreeBSD and various flavors of GNU/Linux), with a few running Windows 7 or Windows XP.

I'd like to begin centralizing all my data on one machine running FreeBSD as well as acting as my NAS with ZFS.

Furthermore I'd like to have a central system to manage users, password, groups that are common to some (or all) of my machines. Basically I'd like to edit my password on the master server and then being able to login on any of my PCs using the new password (without needing to update dozens of times the same user's password). I think as far as this goes that's what LDAP (or maybe even Kerberos?) does, though I'm not sure about the Windows support.

I'd also like to configure my Pfsense router to allow OpenVPN logins from remote locations, "redirecting" the authentication part to my NAS, then being able to freely access my files on the NAS or any other box. This maybe would only be related to firewall configuration though ...

My questions are the following

  1. What should I use for a home-based environment with 1-3 human users (beside all UNIXes users like root, ...)? LDAP / Kerberos / Windows Server 2008?
  2. Does (the one on point 1.) support Windows 7 / Windows XP?

  3. If I configure Pfsense to "redirect" authentication to my NAS / Windows Server (depends on point 1.), should I login once more in order to access my files? Or it all depends on the Samba / NFS sharing settings (basically: allow all connections from local network)? If I have to authenticate on the NAS it would be safe and practical at the same time, though I'm not sure about the procedure if I were to use Windows Server 2008

  4. Have also a local authentication alternative (when I'm on a trip I may not be able to connect remotely to my authentication server). Like what is available on Windows (typically when you press CTRL + ALT + DEL at the computer's boot, you can choose the domain to log on to). Is this also available on GNU/Linux? If so, how is it called?

  5. Do (point 1.) authentication replace local user authentication or is it "just" an add-on (in the sense that the user that may authenticate on a given machine are local users as well as LDAP/Kerberos/... users)?

  6. Security related problems?

  7. Other significant information to keep in mind when doing centralized authentication?

  8. What if a user name gets duplicated? Would this be solved like in Windows' login domain feature?

  9. Do you think doing this is "worth the trouble"?

I already plan to mount shares on each PC I work on via Samba, which would provide a centralized and redundant data storage.

I hope I explained in a clear way what I'd like to do. I'm sorry if I got some technical terms wrong. Please don't hesitate to reply or ask for clarifications.

(I couldn't really choose an accurate title as I don't know exactly what the feature I'm looking for is called. Sorry about that. I hope that the following lines may clear this aspect.)

I own a dozen PCs, mostly running UNIX-based OSes (FreeBSD and various flavors of GNU/Linux), with a few running Windows 7 or Windows XP.

I'd like to begin centralizing all my data on one machine running FreeBSD as well as acting as my NAS with ZFS.

Furthermore I'd like to have a central system to manage users, password, groups that are common to some (or all) of my machines. Basically I'd like to edit my password on the master server and then being able to login on any of my PCs using the new password (without needing to update dozens of times the same user's password). I think as far as this goes that's what LDAP (or maybe even Kerberos?) does, though I'm not sure about the Windows support.

I'd also like to configure my Pfsense router to allow OpenVPN logins from remote locations, "redirecting" the authentication part to my NAS, then being able to freely access my files on the NAS or any other box. This maybe would only be related to firewall configuration though ...

My questions are the following

  1. What should I use for a home-based environment with 1-3 human users (beside all UNIXes users like root, ...)? LDAP / Kerberos / Windows Server 2008?
  2. Does (the one on point 1.) support Windows 7 / Windows XP?

  3. If I configure Pfsense to "redirect" authentication to my NAS / Windows Server (depends on point 1.), should I login once more in order to access my files? Or it all depends on the Samba / NFS sharing settings (basically: allow all connections from local network)? If I have to authenticate on the NAS it would be safe and practical at the same time, though I'm not sure about the procedure if I were to use Windows Server 2008

  4. Have also a local authentication alternative (when I'm on a trip I may not be able to connect remotely to my authentication server). Like what is available on Windows (typically when you press CTRL + ALT + DEL at the computer's boot, you can choose the domain to log on to). Is this also available on GNU/Linux? If so, how is it called?

  5. Do (point 1.) authentication replace local user authentication or is it "just" an add-on (in the sense that the user that may authenticate on a given machine are local users as well as LDAP/Kerberos/... users)?

  6. Security related problems?

  7. Other significant information to keep in mind when doing centralized authentication?

  8. What if a user name gets duplicated? Would this be solved like in Windows' login domain feature?

I already plan to mount shares on each PC I work on via Samba, which would provide a centralized and redundant data storage.

I hope I explained in a clear way what I'd like to do. I'm sorry if I got some technical terms wrong. Please don't hesitate to reply or ask for clarifications.

1
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Multiple PCs network centralized system authentication

(I couldn't really choose an accurate title as I don't know exactly what the feature I'm looking for is called. Sorry about that. I hope that the following lines may clear this aspect.)

I own a dozen PCs, mostly running UNIX-based OSes (FreeBSD and various flavors of GNU/Linux), with a few running Windows 7 or Windows XP.

I'd like to begin centralizing all my data on one machine running FreeBSD as well as acting as my NAS with ZFS.

Furthermore I'd like to have a central system to manage users, password, groups that are common to some (or all) of my machines. Basically I'd like to edit my password on the master server and then being able to login on any of my PCs using the new password (without needing to update dozens of times the same user's password). I think as far as this goes that's what LDAP (or maybe even Kerberos?) does, though I'm not sure about the Windows support.

I'd also like to configure my Pfsense router to allow OpenVPN logins from remote locations, "redirecting" the authentication part to my NAS, then being able to freely access my files on the NAS or any other box. This maybe would only be related to firewall configuration though ...

My questions are the following

  1. What should I use for a home-based environment with 1-3 human users (beside all UNIXes users like root, ...)? LDAP / Kerberos / Windows Server 2008?
  2. Does (the one on point 1.) support Windows 7 / Windows XP?

  3. If I configure Pfsense to "redirect" authentication to my NAS / Windows Server (depends on point 1.), should I login once more in order to access my files? Or it all depends on the Samba / NFS sharing settings (basically: allow all connections from local network)? If I have to authenticate on the NAS it would be safe and practical at the same time, though I'm not sure about the procedure if I were to use Windows Server 2008

  4. Have also a local authentication alternative (when I'm on a trip I may not be able to connect remotely to my authentication server). Like what is available on Windows (typically when you press CTRL + ALT + DEL at the computer's boot, you can choose the domain to log on to). Is this also available on GNU/Linux? If so, how is it called?

  5. Do (point 1.) authentication replace local user authentication or is it "just" an add-on (in the sense that the user that may authenticate on a given machine are local users as well as LDAP/Kerberos/... users)?

  6. Security related problems?

  7. Other significant information to keep in mind when doing centralized authentication?

  8. What if a user name gets duplicated? Would this be solved like in Windows' login domain feature?

  9. Do you think doing this is "worth the trouble"?

I already plan to mount shares on each PC I work on via Samba, which would provide a centralized and redundant data storage.

I hope I explained in a clear way what I'd like to do. I'm sorry if I got some technical terms wrong. Please don't hesitate to reply or ask for clarifications.