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This is an Ubuntu bug that showed up in 12.04 (kernel ~3.2.0.40) and existed until fixed in 16.04. The same problem didn't appear in the Debian builds.

From conversation in the UbunutuUbuntu bug tracker:

(user Tarantoga):

It looks like [Debian] Wheezy disables udev for md and uses an rc-script for assembling at boot; therefore it will not automatically assemble arrays after boot. Trusty assembles real devices during and after boot, but seems to ignore virtual devices like /dev/md0.

Tarantoga found a simple solution by adding a single-line udev rules file:

/etc/udev/rules.d/85-mdadm.rules:

SUBSYSTEM=="block", ACTION=="add|change", ENV{ID_FS_TYPE}=="linux_raid_member", DEVPATH=="*/virtual/*", RUN+="/sbin/mdadm --incremental $tempnode"

This solution just worked for me. I have a mirror of two stripes and only the stripes would assemble at boot time. Putting this rule in place caused everything to assemble properly.

(And, yes, I have a specific use case where a mirror of stripes is better than a stripe of mirrors :-) )

This is an Ubuntu bug that showed up in 12.04 (kernel ~3.2.0.40) and existed until fixed in 16.04. The same problem didn't appear in the Debian builds.

From conversation in the Ubunutu bug tracker:

(user Tarantoga):

It looks like [Debian] Wheezy disables udev for md and uses an rc-script for assembling at boot; therefore it will not automatically assemble arrays after boot. Trusty assembles real devices during and after boot, but seems to ignore virtual devices like /dev/md0.

Tarantoga found a simple solution by adding a single-line udev rules file:

/etc/udev/rules.d/85-mdadm.rules:

SUBSYSTEM=="block", ACTION=="add|change", ENV{ID_FS_TYPE}=="linux_raid_member", DEVPATH=="*/virtual/*", RUN+="/sbin/mdadm --incremental $tempnode"

This solution just worked for me. I have a mirror of two stripes and only the stripes would assemble at boot time. Putting this rule in place caused everything to assemble properly.

(And, yes, I have a specific use case where a mirror of stripes is better than a stripe of mirrors :-) )

This is an Ubuntu bug that showed up in 12.04 (kernel ~3.2.0.40) and existed until fixed in 16.04. The same problem didn't appear in the Debian builds.

From conversation in the Ubuntu bug tracker:

(user Tarantoga):

It looks like [Debian] Wheezy disables udev for md and uses an rc-script for assembling at boot; therefore it will not automatically assemble arrays after boot. Trusty assembles real devices during and after boot, but seems to ignore virtual devices like /dev/md0.

Tarantoga found a simple solution by adding a single-line udev rules file:

/etc/udev/rules.d/85-mdadm.rules:

SUBSYSTEM=="block", ACTION=="add|change", ENV{ID_FS_TYPE}=="linux_raid_member", DEVPATH=="*/virtual/*", RUN+="/sbin/mdadm --incremental $tempnode"

This solution just worked for me. I have a mirror of two stripes and only the stripes would assemble at boot time. Putting this rule in place caused everything to assemble properly.

(And, yes, I have a specific use case where a mirror of stripes is better than a stripe of mirrors :-) )

1
source | link

This is an Ubuntu bug that showed up in 12.04 (kernel ~3.2.0.40) and existed until fixed in 16.04. The same problem didn't appear in the Debian builds.

From conversation in the Ubunutu bug tracker:

(user Tarantoga):

It looks like [Debian] Wheezy disables udev for md and uses an rc-script for assembling at boot; therefore it will not automatically assemble arrays after boot. Trusty assembles real devices during and after boot, but seems to ignore virtual devices like /dev/md0.

Tarantoga found a simple solution by adding a single-line udev rules file:

/etc/udev/rules.d/85-mdadm.rules:

SUBSYSTEM=="block", ACTION=="add|change", ENV{ID_FS_TYPE}=="linux_raid_member", DEVPATH=="*/virtual/*", RUN+="/sbin/mdadm --incremental $tempnode"

This solution just worked for me. I have a mirror of two stripes and only the stripes would assemble at boot time. Putting this rule in place caused everything to assemble properly.

(And, yes, I have a specific use case where a mirror of stripes is better than a stripe of mirrors :-) )