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I found this: https://docs.pmem.io/getting-started-guide/creating-development-environments/linux-environments/linux-memmap

Assuming you have a new enough kernel, adding memmap=124!900 should make the desired memory accessible as /dev/pmem0 .

It advises to also add nokaslr, otherwise you may get random system errors. KASLR is a security feature which makes it harder to exploit the kernel.

Although this has been used for fascinating hacks, I am not able to recommend it for your case. I do not know how to manage the CPU caches v.s. updates from the FPGA (aka DMA). And our advice on other questions is not to do this :-).


There's also another option, though it doesn't answer the question as written. I think you can boot with iomem=relaxed, if you wanted to temporarily disable STRICT_DEVMEM without compiling a whole new kernel.

I found this: https://docs.pmem.io/getting-started-guide/creating-development-environments/linux-environments/linux-memmap

Assuming you have a new enough kernel, adding memmap=124!900 should make the desired memory accessible as /dev/pmem0 .

It advises to also add nokaslr, otherwise you may get random system errors. KASLR is a security feature which makes it harder to exploit the kernel.

Although this has been used for fascinating hacks, I am not able to recommend it for your case. I do not know how to manage the CPU caches v.s. updates from the FPGA (aka DMA). And our advice on other questions is not to do this :-).

I found this: https://docs.pmem.io/getting-started-guide/creating-development-environments/linux-environments/linux-memmap

Assuming you have a new enough kernel, adding memmap=124!900 should make the desired memory accessible as /dev/pmem0 .

It advises to also add nokaslr, otherwise you may get random system errors. KASLR is a security feature which makes it harder to exploit the kernel.

Although this has been used for fascinating hacks, I am not able to recommend it for your case. I do not know how to manage the CPU caches v.s. updates from the FPGA (aka DMA). And our advice on other questions is not to do this :-).


There's also another option, though it doesn't answer the question as written. I think you can boot with iomem=relaxed, if you wanted to temporarily disable STRICT_DEVMEM without compiling a whole new kernel.

3 edited body
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I found this: https://docs.pmem.io/getting-started-guide/creating-development-environments/linux-environments/linux-memmap

Assuming you have a new enough kernel, adding memmap=900memmap=124!124900 should make the desired memory accessible as /dev/pmem0 .

It advises to also add nokaslr, otherwise you may get random system errors. KASLR is a security feature which makes it harder to exploit the kernel.

Although this has been used for fascinating hacks, I am not able to recommend it for your case. I do not know how to manage the CPU caches v.s. updates from the FPGA (aka DMA). And our advice on other questions is not to do this :-).

I found this: https://docs.pmem.io/getting-started-guide/creating-development-environments/linux-environments/linux-memmap

Assuming you have a new enough kernel, adding memmap=900!124 should make the desired memory accessible as /dev/pmem0 .

It advises to also add nokaslr, otherwise you may get random system errors. KASLR is a security feature which makes it harder to exploit the kernel.

Although this has been used for fascinating hacks, I am not able to recommend it for your case. I do not know how to manage the CPU caches v.s. updates from the FPGA (aka DMA). And our advice on other questions is not to do this :-).

I found this: https://docs.pmem.io/getting-started-guide/creating-development-environments/linux-environments/linux-memmap

Assuming you have a new enough kernel, adding memmap=124!900 should make the desired memory accessible as /dev/pmem0 .

It advises to also add nokaslr, otherwise you may get random system errors. KASLR is a security feature which makes it harder to exploit the kernel.

Although this has been used for fascinating hacks, I am not able to recommend it for your case. I do not know how to manage the CPU caches v.s. updates from the FPGA (aka DMA). And our advice on other questions is not to do this :-).

2 added 16 characters in body
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AddingI found this: https://docs.pmem.io/getting-started-guide/creating-development-environments/linux-environments/linux-memmap

Assuming you have a new enough kernel, adding memmap=900!124 should make thatthe desired memory accessible as /dev/pmem0 , if you have a new enough kernel.

You are advisedIt advises to also add nokaslr, otherwise you may get random system errors. KASLR is a security feature which makes it harder to exploit the kernel.

https://docs.pmem.io/getting-started-guide/creating-development-environments/linux-environments/linux-memmap

Although this has been used for fascinating hacks, I am not able to recommend it for your case. I do not know how to manage the CPU caches v.s. updates from the FPGA (aka DMA). And our advice on other questions is not to do this :-).

Adding memmap=900!124 should make that memory accessible as /dev/pmem0 , if you have a new enough kernel.

You are advised to also add nokaslr, otherwise you may get random system errors. KASLR is a security feature which makes it harder to exploit the kernel.

https://docs.pmem.io/getting-started-guide/creating-development-environments/linux-environments/linux-memmap

Although this has been used for fascinating hacks, I am not able to recommend it for your case. I do not know how to manage the CPU caches v.s. updates from the FPGA (aka DMA). And our advice on other questions is not to do this :-).

I found this: https://docs.pmem.io/getting-started-guide/creating-development-environments/linux-environments/linux-memmap

Assuming you have a new enough kernel, adding memmap=900!124 should make the desired memory accessible as /dev/pmem0 .

It advises to also add nokaslr, otherwise you may get random system errors. KASLR is a security feature which makes it harder to exploit the kernel.

Although this has been used for fascinating hacks, I am not able to recommend it for your case. I do not know how to manage the CPU caches v.s. updates from the FPGA (aka DMA). And our advice on other questions is not to do this :-).

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